Thread: In Perspective, Planet: Ehancing the brain!
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Old May 2nd, 2012, 05:22 AM
Tom dinning Tom dinning is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Darwin NT Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Now, that seems a pleasant alternative. It may not cure dementia, but should make it quite bearable.
That sounds like a better idea than telling stories to my GREAT-grandchilden. I'm joining you Jerome.

Good advise, Asher. I'm aware that genetics plays its part as well. That doesn't mean we give into them, just work with them. Having taught people with disabilities, some of which gained their disability by accident or disease later in life, its amazing how, with the right processes, they can relearn skills they lost by using other parts of the brain. There are some peculiar outcomes to this at times. Doing things a bit different is quite often surprising to the person as it is to observers. My friend, Lyn suffered horendous brain damage in a car accident. She lost her memory up to the point of the accident and has poor short term memory, lost all speach, vision, and muscle coordination. After 8 years she can talk (strangely enough, with a New Zealand accent because her speech therapist is from there), her vision is back, and she is relatively active. She is only just figuring out how to add and subtract or use simple things like a remote for the TV. Yet she is now a reputable artist even having never done anything artistic in her prevous 45 years. She had to learn to recognise her own mother and daughter all over again. They say she is not the same person they knew before the accident but they love the new Lyn just as much. I never knew the old Lyn. The new one is a very motivated person and a great advocate for brain damage victims.
You can read more about Lyn here:
http://lyntemby.com.au/

Cheers
Tom
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