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  #1  
Old January 31st, 2012, 10:44 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Default Hell Bank Note

Chinese people usually burn their dead and may keep the urn at home. But they also put a little tab with the name and sometimes picture of the deceased member of their family on display in their local temple. They also bring offerings of candlelights, incense, food and sometimes (fake) money as is shown here. It is like a miniature graveyard.


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  #2  
Old February 1st, 2012, 07:01 AM
Ruben Alfu Ruben Alfu is offline
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Hi Jerome,

Very interesting, I don't remember having seen urns kept in this manner. There's so much to read in this photo about human nature...

Regards,

Ruben
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  #3  
Old February 1st, 2012, 07:41 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruben Alfu View Post
I don't remember having seen urns kept in this manner.
This was with ethnic chinese, but not in mainland China. You don't see this often in mainland China, many religious practices have been actively discouraged by the communist government for years.
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Old February 1st, 2012, 09:01 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Hi Jerome,

I like this photo. But I have been wondering about the title "Hell Bank Note". Money to get out of hell or something else?
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  #5  
Old February 1st, 2012, 09:15 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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"Helll Bank Note" is written on top of the bank note. You can read it on the picture. This is common for fake money given to the deceased.
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  #6  
Old February 1st, 2012, 09:32 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
....You can read it on the picture. ...
No I can't, especially when surfing on a mobile device. ;)
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  #7  
Old February 1st, 2012, 09:47 AM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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A very interesting photo Jerome.

However, I am bit confused with the term ' ethnic Chinese '. Are the mainland ' Chinese '

not ethnic Chinese. For example the Han Chinese.

A very good insight in people's way of life, and the respect for their dead.

Thanks for sharing.
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  #8  
Old February 1st, 2012, 10:16 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
No I can't, especially when surfing on a mobile device. ;)
Use the zoom function.
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Old February 1st, 2012, 10:18 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fahim mohammed View Post
However, I am bit confused with the term ' ethnic Chinese '. Are the mainland ' Chinese ' not ethnic Chinese. for example the Han Chinese?
By "ethnic Chinese", I mean the people of chinese descent living outside mainland China. I thought the expression was widely used.
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Old February 1st, 2012, 10:30 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Use the zoom function.
Post larger.
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  #11  
Old February 1st, 2012, 10:31 AM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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Thanks Jerome for that definition/understanding.

Let's leave it at that.

Regards.
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  #12  
Old February 1st, 2012, 11:47 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Chinese people usually burn their dead and may keep the urn at home. But they also put a little tab with the name and sometimes picture of the deceased member of their family on display in their local temple. They also bring offerings of candlelights, incense, food and sometimes (fake) money as is shown here. It is like a miniature graveyard.


This slays. Beautiful. Thanks for posting. I learnt something today Jerome.
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  #13  
Old February 1st, 2012, 01:24 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Post larger.
There you are:

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  #14  
Old February 1st, 2012, 01:32 PM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
There you are:
Hi Jerome,

I was just pulling your leg ;)
But thanks anyway.
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  #15  
Old February 2nd, 2012, 08:29 AM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
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It's curious that English is used in a Chinese funerary setting.

Wikipedia has an interesting account of the hell bank note.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_bank_note
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  #16  
Old February 2nd, 2012, 09:03 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracy Lebenzon View Post
It's curious that English is used in a Chinese funerary setting.

Wikipedia has an interesting account of the hell bank note.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_bank_note
Thank you for the wikipedia link. I did not find it very odd that the words were in English, because this was taken in Malaysia where English is a somewhat official language. Besides the notes may have been printed in Singapore, where English is definitely an official language. But the wikipedia link makes it clear that this kind of notes use English in mainland China as well, and English is certainly not an official language in mainland China. Apparently, it is just a representation of western money.
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