Open Photography Forums  
HOME FORUMS NEWS FAQ SEARCH

Go Back   Open Photography Forums > OPF Welcome Hall > Panorama Photography: Vistas, Interiors & Objects

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #181  
Old January 10th, 2012, 11:56 AM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greenwater, Wa
Posts: 201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Tracy,

Did you mean iconographically as well as aesthetically rich, or do you indeed, really mean that the picture helps map out the quarter?

BTW, Ben is actually making sophisticated interactive panoramas in which one can go from one room to another.

Asher

Yes, “iconographically” is correct. Thanks for catching that.

I have a problem, well actually 2 of them. Problem #1 is that my eyes suck and problem #2 is if I put the monitors closer to them than they are now (which is about 2’ away) then my cats tend to knock them over when they seek my attention.

Due to this combination of problems my spelling correction sometimes takes liberties that my sucky eyes don’t catch. The results are humorous sometimes but usually a mild embarrassment for me...


>BTW, Ben is actually making sophisticated interactive panoramas in which one can go from one room to another.

Where are examples of this?
__________________
Justan-Elk.com
Reply With Quote
  #182  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:00 PM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greenwater, Wa
Posts: 201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Thanks Tracy, the Timeless Collection is available in either 10X20" or 15X30" though I could do a 20X40" from them there is so much detail from the stitches!

I have a show in California in September next year but if you know anyone else who would to show this kind of thing let me know. I'm hoping Asher's show does take off and I can show there too.

I will let you know if I come across any specific candidates. This area (Seattle) has a large number of galleries and synagogues. Many would delight at a show of this type.

edit: BTW, Asher, how is the plan for a group show coming along? I don’t plan to submit (my big works are too big to ship) but I'm wondering how that is evolving.
__________________
Justan-Elk.com
Reply With Quote
  #183  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:02 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracy Lebenzon View Post

>BTW, Ben is actually making sophisticated interactive panoramas in which one can go from one room to another.

Where are examples of this?
Don't bother Tracy, it's very much a work in progress and perhaps even questionable progress at that, still trying to learn it properly though I finally solved a serious issue I was having and now with SNS-HDR becoming so very advanced I'm interested to see where it goes in the future if I can get the mobility to do it properly. I'd allowed it to lapse hugely for months as I'm still recovering from an operation on my leg some 4 months ago.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #184  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:06 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracy Lebenzon View Post
I will let you know if I come across any specific candidates. This area (Seattle) has a large number of galleries and synagogues. Many would delight at a show of this type.

edit: BTW, Asher, how is the plan for a group show coming along? I don’t plan to submit (my big works are too big to ship) but I'm wondering how that is evolving.
Now my father lives in New York and has taken over as the Rabbi for a large social/religious program there I am hoping that 2012 will allow me the scope to be able to exhibit in the big apple and break into the US scene successfully.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #185  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:09 PM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greenwater, Wa
Posts: 201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Don't bother Tracy, it's very much a work in progress and perhaps even questionable progress at that, still trying to learn it properly though I finally solved a serious issue I was having and now with SNS-HDR becoming so very advanced I'm interested to see where it goes in the future if I can get the mobility to do it properly. I'd allowed it to lapse hugely for months as I'm still recovering from an operation on my leg some 4 months ago.
Well, keep us up to date on the project. I've heard a lot about SNS-HDR recently and might have to try it the next time I do some work ups with hdr stitches.

BTW I have crappy ankles that have largely necessitated that I wear hiking boots when I'm outside for injury avoidance. I *love* Aslo brand of hiking boots. They are extremely comfortable right out of the box in part because they make sizes that fit wide feet. They are also water proof. I have several pairs and have put new soles on my oldest pair. Barring these I’d have destroyed what is left of my ankles soft tissue quite some time ago.
__________________
Justan-Elk.com
Reply With Quote
  #186  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:12 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

I just got my first pair of real orthapedic boots this month, real as in made specifically for me and looking like the things they gave old people to wear 20 years ago, big huge clompy things same height as my old army boots. Oh well, I've spent my whole life trying to pretend that I'm not disabled but I've kinda lost the battle.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #187  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:12 PM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greenwater, Wa
Posts: 201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Now my father lives in New York and has taken over as the Rabbi for a large social/religious program there I am hoping that 2012 will allow me the scope to be able to exhibit in the big apple and break into the US scene successfully.


I spoke to a Rabbi in Portland (OR) recently about doing a show at their congregation and he said he’d be willing. But a gig in NY would be HUGE!

I've found that most are extremely receptive to an email message that includes links to examples. A follow up email about a week later is always a good idea.
__________________
Justan-Elk.com
Reply With Quote
  #188  
Old January 10th, 2012, 12:18 PM
Tracy Lebenzon Tracy Lebenzon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greenwater, Wa
Posts: 201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
I just got my first pair of real orthapedic boots this month, real as in made specifically for me and looking like the things they gave old people to wear 20 years ago, big huge clompy things same height as my old army boots. Oh well, I've spent my whole life trying to pretend that I'm not disabled but I've kinda lost the battle.
For me, my ankles will go sideways with only the slightest provocation. It all started due to a tennis injury over 30 years ago. I've used hiking boots as my primary shoe for probably 20 years. FWIW, I also use an off the shelf orthotic called “Superfeet” I had some custom fit orthotics made for my ski boots and those were fabulous. Superfeet cost about 10% of custom made ones and do about 95% of the job.
__________________
Justan-Elk.com
Reply With Quote
  #189  
Old April 28th, 2012, 12:34 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Wow, looking at the last picture I realise just how long it is since I've had the chance to go out shooting project work! Here is a bit more from the Contemplation (Part 2) project.

I now teach in a local art college once a week. The college was going for a weekend trip to the town of Hebron, famous for being the burial place of the Patriachs and Matriachs and revered by 3 religions. Photography was not high on their agenda but I was invited to join them on friday and never having been to Hebron before I willingly agreed.

We got to the Cave of the Patriarchs and the guide told us we had just 7 minutes for photography. My job was both to direct and help the students as well as fulfil the request of the head of the college to give them a pro pic or two as well as a favour (they were paying me very well for this trip). You can imagine how hard it was to find somewhere to shoot, direct and help the class all within that time frame. Added to that, in a masochistic mood I'd brought just my 5D and my little Pentax Super Tak 50mm lens with. Most of my gear is in NY, on loan to a friend shooting a wedding there and I did want to drive home a point I'd mentioned in the last class about gear really not being that important.

For almost a millenium Jews were only allowed to ascend to the 7th step at the south east entrance to the structure (which is huge!) to pray. They were not allowed to enter or even come any closer than this small, sloping and uneven step to pray at what is the longest standing and 2nd holiest site in Jewish belief. Now of course the structure built originally by Herod is accessable to Jews. Ever since I saw a picture of the 7th step in an old encyclopedia I'd wanted to visit it, to feel the melancholy history embodied by that small rock surface. I had just 6 minutes and most of that I was helping others but I managed to get this picture of the 7th Step, now empty of people but with a dusty lectern still there should anyone wish to come and pray.


The 7th Step

Next item on the agenda was the burial place of Ruth, of the 'Book of Ruth' in the Old Testament, the head of the family of King David and the line of royalty of the Jewish people. The burial place has a synagogue built over it with an area to light memorial candles however I started to wander around and found the entrance to a cave. It was very small and lots of building work was being done there, walling up the inside of the cave. It appears that this was the site of the ancient synagogue that had been on the site. I took this photo towards the back entrance of the cave. For me it tells a powerful story from the life of Ruth but I won't bore you with historical details! This time I only had 5 minutes at that site.


Ruth

So, 11 minutes in total, never been there before but I did have a strong awareness of the history which helped me in finding what I wanted to portray even in such a short time. I shot just these two pictures. Literally.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #190  
Old April 28th, 2012, 01:57 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,333
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Wow, looking at the last picture I realise just how long it is since I've had the chance to go out shooting project work! Here is a bit more from the Contemplation (Part 2) project.

I now teach in a local art college once a week. The college was going for a weekend trip to the town of Hebron, famous for being the burial place of the Patriachs and Matriachs and revered by 3 religions. Photography was not high on their agenda but I was invited to join them on friday and never having been to Hebron before I willingly agreed.

We got to the Cave of the Patriarchs and the guide told us we had just 7 minutes for photography. My job was both to direct and help the students as well as fulfil the request of the head of the college to give them a pro pic or two as well as a favour (they were paying me very well for this trip). You can imagine how hard it was to find somewhere to shoot, direct and help the class all within that time frame. Added to that, in a masochistic mood I'd brought just my 5D and my little Pentax Super Tak 50mm lens with. Most of my gear is in NY, on loan to a friend shooting a wedding there and I did want to drive home a point I'd mentioned in the last class about gear really not being that important.

For almost a millenium Jews were only allowed to ascend to the 7th step at the south east entrance to the structure (which is huge!) to pray. They were not allowed to enter or even come any closer than this small, sloping and uneven step to pray at what is the longest standing and 2nd holiest site in Jewish belief. Now of course the structure built originally by Herod is accessable to Jews. Ever since I saw a picture of the 7th step in an old encyclopedia I'd wanted to visit it, to feel the melancholy history embodied by that small rock surface. I had just 6 minutes and most of that I was helping others but I managed to get this picture of the 7th Step, now empty of people but with a dusty lectern still there should anyone wish to come and pray.


The 7th Step

Next item on the agenda was the burial place of Ruth, of the 'Book of Ruth' in the Old Testament, the head of the family of King David and the line of royalty of the Jewish people. The burial place has a synagogue built over it with an area to light memorial candles however I started to wander around and found the entrance to a cave. It was very small and lots of building work was being done there, walling up the inside of the cave. It appears that this was the site of the ancient synagogue that had been on the site. I took this photo towards the back entrance of the cave. For me it tells a powerful story from the life of Ruth but I won't bore you with historical details! This time I only had 5 minutes at that site.


Ruth

So, 11 minutes in total, never been there before but I did have a strong awareness of the history which helped me in finding what I wanted to portray even in such a short time. I shot just these two pictures. Literally.
Ben,

the history is not important to me - the work you are makeing is - I take away your context and get knocked out by your The 7th Step.

thanks for posting.
Reply With Quote
  #191  
Old May 3rd, 2012, 09:45 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Firstly thank you Mark! Secondly I'm actually interested, I'm not 100% sure that it's such a strong image, it means something to me but I didn't think it was that good to be honest :-)
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #192  
Old May 4th, 2012, 02:17 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 25,929
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Wow, looking at the last picture I realise just how long it is since I've had the chance to go out shooting project work! Here is a bit more from the Contemplation (Part 2) project.
Well Ben,

This change in location was a huge surprise but the result isn't! I must admit that you fooled me. My immediate attention went to your new pictures and I thought that you had just decided to bring objects out of a yeshiva or synagogue to photograph in the narrow stone streets. I was taken aback when I actually read the text putting us back thousands of years into antiquity with the burial place of the patriarchs and matriarchs of monotheism.




The 7th Step


I can't make out the actual step. From which vantage point are we looking. The slop makes it hard to fathom without some guidance.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #193  
Old May 5th, 2012, 10:29 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

There is only one step left, the rise to and from the step has now been transformed into green grass and plants, only that one small 2m squared piece of stone is still remaining.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #194  
Old May 5th, 2012, 11:10 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 25,929
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
There is only one step left, the rise to and from the step has now been transformed into green grass and plants, only that one small 2m squared piece of stone is still remaining.
Ben,

That explains things. Now who made that change and why? Were people tripping on the step or was it to abolish the previous boundary or the 7th step for Jews?

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #195  
Old May 6th, 2012, 12:12 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Given how degrading those steps were, I can see why they were covered up and made into a garden instead.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #196  
Old July 8th, 2012, 08:03 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

I had never been happy with the first version of this picture seen on another thread and also here:



The light wasn't right and the canon lens I used didn't have the rendition I had imagined for the image. It was actually this image which inspired me to buy my Takumar 50mm f1.4 Super.

I've been back a couple of times, never seemed to get it to work. I took the day off work today for various reasons and took the opportunity to go back and try again. I'm finally happy with the image. The rendition is as I imagined, the composition and lighting finally suit the scene as I envisaged it. Took 4 hours in 30 degree heat but I finally have the picture I wanted.


Taranto

Just to recap the caption I wrote with the original image:

I showed this picture to my friend, a Yemenite Jew who grew up in the old back alleys of Jerusalem. He said "It takes me back to going to the synagogue with my father holding my hand, the quiet alley, the small doorway, the dim lighting, the old men and the smell of books".

I teach my students this and any true photographer knows it like they know their apertures and shutter speeds. Go back, again and again and again until it's perfect!
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #197  
Old July 8th, 2012, 10:02 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 25,929
Default Returning!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
I had never been happy with the first version of this picture seen on another thread and also here:


The light wasn't right and the canon lens I used didn't have the rendition I had imagined for the image. It was actually this image which inspired me to buy my Takumar 50mm f1.4 Super.

I've been back a couple of times, never seemed to get it to work. I took the day off work today for various reasons and took the opportunity to go back and try again. I'm finally happy with the image. The rendition is as I imagined, the composition and lighting finally suit the scene as I envisaged it. Took 4 hours in 30 degree heat but I finally have the picture I wanted.


Taranto

Just to recap the caption I wrote with the original image:

I showed this picture to my friend, a Yemenite Jew who grew up in the old back alleys of Jerusalem. He said "It takes me back to going to the synagogue with my father holding my hand, the quiet alley, the small doorway, the dim lighting, the old men and the smell of books".

I teach my students this and any true photographer knows it like they know their apertures and shutter speeds. Go back, again and again and again until it's perfect![/QUOTE]


Ben,

I believe that returning is an important aspect of photography. I often photocopy a picture and then mark up the copies as to where I missed and then return to try again. At times it's not these marks that are the reason for dissatisfaction, but rather some other element. Here, the figure of the person disappearing in the background adds a lot. That alone must have been a key element that moved you.

The light and the lens, of course, make the mood and now everything is there! Kudos. This is now a picture to return to often!

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #198  
Old July 14th, 2012, 12:07 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,447
Default

Yes but actually the other way round. The light and the composition came first. Then the little girl whom I waited about an hour for. I hadn't imagined the image with the person originally, this is the first time I included a human element. The image doesn't need it to work and that is a key point, if you need human interaction in a scene like this then the composition and light isn't strong enough in the first place. Once you have the composition and lighting you can add elements to change the image for a specific look.
__________________
Ben Rubinstein
Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com
Blog: http://thedustylenscap.com
Reply With Quote
  #199  
Old July 17th, 2012, 01:02 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,333
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Firstly thank you Mark! Secondly I'm actually interested, I'm not 100% sure that it's such a strong image, it means something to me but I didn't think it was that good to be honest :-)
Mark E Smith from the fall used one of these when in concert in the 90s - so that's why I liked it. reminded me of that music and those time - pure nostalgia.
Reply With Quote
  #200  
Old August 20th, 2012, 08:59 AM
Lakshitha Udara Lakshitha Udara is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 11
Default

nice B&w photography !
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:48 PM.


Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet © of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion © 2006-2014 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!