Open Photography Forums  
HOME FORUMS NEWS FAQ SEARCH

Go Back   Open Photography Forums > OPF Welcome Hall > Breaking News

Breaking News Updates, innovations, equipment: moderated!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 4th, 2007, 05:50 AM
Ray West Ray West is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UK - Somerset
Posts: 1,703
Default high res images (astronomy)

Just a link

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6975961.stm

Best wishes,

Ray
__________________
All images posted in OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated Comment Only or Edit and Repost.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old September 4th, 2007, 06:40 AM
Michael Fontana Michael Fontana is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 1,557
Smile

I want a lucky cam, too
__________________
http://www.proimago.net
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 4th, 2007, 07:21 AM
Ray West Ray West is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UK - Somerset
Posts: 1,703
Default

Hi Michael,

Well, I think Hugin does it as well ;-)

A better link - re 'lucky' http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~optics/Lucky_Web_Site/index.htm
which was linked from the previous ref. has some nice animated gifs

Best wishes,

Ray
__________________
All images posted in OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated Comment Only or Edit and Repost.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 4th, 2007, 12:58 PM
Ivan Garcia Ivan Garcia is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Elstree, England
Posts: 453
Default

WOW… I can´t wait for them to upload a modified Lucky cam in to the Hubble space telescope.
The resulting images will be amazing
__________________
Kind regards
Ivan
Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 4th, 2007, 01:07 PM
Andrew Stannard Andrew Stannard is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lancashire, UK
Posts: 371
Default

Interesting link, it always amazes me to see the images that astronomers can produce today.

Quote:
I can´t wait for them to upload a modified Lucky cam in to the Hubble space telescope.
Interesting thought that. If Hubble's already above the haze I wonder how much difference it would make? I wonder how much 'space haze' there is!
__________________
Webpage
Blog
Twitter
Facebook Page
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 4th, 2007, 01:15 PM
Ivan Garcia Ivan Garcia is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Elstree, England
Posts: 453
Default

I don´t know about “Space haze”. But I am sure the new chip (with its reduced electronic noise) and the new software, will make a huge difference.
Question is, why would NASA invest millions of $ in the update, when the Palomar 200inch is producing really good imagines.
__________________
Kind regards
Ivan
Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old September 4th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Eric Hiss Eric Hiss is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 275
Default implications of the newer sensor technology

Just reading through one of the links it states that while the 'lucky' technology of taking very fast exposures and combining the best parts has been around since 1978 at least in idea form, it hasn't been possible until recently when sensors have been developed which can read out the data faster without adding noise.

Looks like these types of sensors will be useful for making high resolution video a reality as well as very fast frame rate cameras or more likely both in the same device.
__________________
Eric W. Hiss
www.eh21.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old September 4th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 32,777
Default

These pictures are remarkable.

However, something like the same ideas, combining the occaisional good shots in a sequence of blurred images, has been used for sometime in "gating" in medical imaging, where motion artifacts are removed by using ony shots corresponding to the hearts beat sequence.

Similarly, high speed strobes, allows one to observe rotors spinning at high speed for signs of damage!

Here, however, the astronomers have to select the rare images through an irregularly changing layer of atmospheric distortion. This is much harder and a brilliant achievement!

Still, I wonder why no one thought of this before!

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:25 AM.


Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet © of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion © 2006-2017 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!