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Image Processing and Workflow RAW, DNG , TIFF and JPG. From Capture to Ready for Publish/Display. All software and techniques used within an image workflow, (except extensive retouching and repair or DAM).

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  #1  
Old January 26th, 2010, 08:21 PM
ErikJonas ErikJonas is offline
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Default Editing Question...

When i go to save a file i get 3 options and this is in Elements 1) Base Line Standard 2) Baseline Optimized and 3)Progressive.... It defaults to 1) Base Line Standard and thats how i save it,is that the best setting to save it at?
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Old January 26th, 2010, 08:53 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Erik,

It depends what you mean by "it"? What are you saving and why? What's it's value to you today or next year?
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  #3  
Old January 26th, 2010, 10:27 PM
ErikJonas ErikJonas is offline
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Theres got to be a one or another regaurdless....I mean you always want to save something in the best quality right?
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Old January 27th, 2010, 01:46 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Erik,

It depends what you mean by "it"? What are you saving and why? What's it's value to you today or next year?
Hi Asher,

Erik is saving jpg files from Elements. These options result in exactly the same image quality, there is no difference in quality at all. A baseline or simple jpg file is a top-to-bottom rendering of the image and it displays in that sequence on the browsers or on viewers. Progressive ones are divided into a range of scans across the whole of the image (i.e. interlaced) and they display the whole image at the beginning (albeit blurred) and keep on loading the remaning portions by means of which the image gets successively sharper until it is fully loaded. The progresive jpg method is not supported by all browsers or viewers out there, so it is safer to use the baseline method, which is universally displayable. The progressive method makes sense for very large images and when one is surfing on a narrowband internet connection.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikJonas View Post
When i go to save a file i get 3 options and this is in Elements 1) Base Line Standard 2) Baseline Optimized and 3)Progressive.... It defaults to 1) Base Line Standard and thats how i save it,is that the best setting to save it at?
Erik,

It is quite fine to use the option 1. The image quality is not going to change by this setting. The IQ is set when you indicate the quality level (usually indicated as x%; 100% being the least possible compression). But beware; jpg is a lossy compression method so the IQ will deteriorate each time you open an image and save it , even if you use the 100% option. That is the reason that if you shoot jpg only, you should:
1) Save the original as your master and never ever touch it. Copy it to a working version.
2) Open the copy version and save it as tif (which is lossless)
3) Do all editing and saving on the tif version
4) For the final output (web, print, etc), you can save the tif version as a jpg file, while keeping the tif version as your master file.
5) Once the output file has been generated as jpg, do not edit and save it anymore.

HTH
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  #5  
Old January 27th, 2010, 02:27 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Cem,

You gave a marvelous answer! I, of course, am on my mantra of avoiding jpg for anything serious! It's just a marvelous way to share finished images for viewing on the web!

Asher
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  #6  
Old February 22nd, 2010, 12:02 PM
Wayne Stratton Wayne Stratton is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikJonas View Post
When i go to save a file i get 3 options and this is in Elements 1) Base Line Standard 2) Baseline Optimized and 3)Progressive.... It defaults to 1) Base Line Standard and thats how i save it,is that the best setting to save it at?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Hi Asher,

Erik is saving jpg files from Elements. These options result in exactly the same image quality, there is no difference in quality at all. A baseline or simple jpg file is a top-to-bottom rendering of the image and it displays in that sequence on the browsers or on viewers. Progressive ones are divided into a range of scans across the whole of the image (i.e. interlaced) and they display the whole image at the beginning (albeit blurred) and keep on loading the remaning portions by means of which the image gets successively sharper until it is fully loaded. The progresive jpg method is not supported by all browsers or viewers out there, so it is safer to use the baseline method, which is universally displayable. The progressive method makes sense for very large images and when one is surfing on a narrowband internet connection.


Erik,

It is quite fine to use the option 1. The image quality is not going to change by this setting. The IQ is set when you indicate the quality level (usually indicated as x%; 100% being the least possible compression). But beware; jpg is a lossy compression method so the IQ will deteriorate each time you open an image and save it , even if you use the 100% option. That is the reason that if you shoot jpg only, you should:
1) Save the original as your master and never ever touch it. Copy it to a working version.
2) Open the copy version and save it as tif (which is lossless)
3) Do all editing and saving on the tif version
4) For the final output (web, print, etc), you can save the tif version as a jpg file, while keeping the tif version as your master file.
5) Once the output file has been generated as jpg, do not edit and save it anymore.

HTH
Erik, I was wondering the same thing!

Cem, thanks for the great explanation. If I understand correctly and if I am shooting in RAW, do I still save in TIF when I am finished or go right to jpeg if I am not going to edit any further?
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  #7  
Old February 22nd, 2010, 02:59 PM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Stratton View Post
Erik, I was wondering the same thing!

Cem, thanks for the great explanation. If I understand correctly and if I am shooting in RAW, do I still save in TIF when I am finished or go right to jpeg if I am not going to edit any further?
Hi Wayne,

Personally, I always save a tif version as the master file and then save another one as jpg to be posted on the Internet. If the whole editing is taking place in a parametric editing program (such as Lightroom), then there is no need to save a tif version, one can then export a jpg version directly.

Cheers,
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