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  #1  
Old April 12th, 2015, 03:41 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Default A Vase of Flowers!

I stood by in awe as the Curator of photographs at the Getty Museum looked at the photographs of Wild Flowers in Vases by Paul Chamlee. She always uses the lens stopped down. I, of course, almost never go beyond f 4.0 and 5.6 is aggressive. However, here, I ventured into the damaging region of f11.0, something never to do with tiny pixels!

I felt that it would be a tribute to her work to make pictures of flowers too. I have no easy access to wild flowers, but we always have fresh blooms from the supermarket....supplemented by flowers from my garden.




Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #01

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f11.0


Enjoy! Comment welcomed!

Asher
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  #2  
Old April 13th, 2015, 12:43 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #02

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f8.0


more to come!


Asher
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  #3  
Old April 13th, 2015, 07:57 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post


Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #02

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f8.0
These are both exquisite! They have a very ** "classical" (perhaps "1940's") look. Very nicely executed.
**Whatever I initially typed there, my spell checker changed it to "Jewry".
The first one almost makes me say, "almost looks like a photograph".

Bravo on these marvelous works.

And my congratulations to Messrs. Steinheil of Munchen. (My late first wife used to refer to people from Munich as "Munchkins".)

Best regards,

Doug
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  #4  
Old April 13th, 2015, 08:14 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I stood by in awe as the Curator of photographs at the Getty Museum looked at the photographs of Wild Flowers in Vases by Paul Chamlee. She always uses the lens stopped down. I, of course, almost never go beyond f 4.0 and 5.6 is aggressive. However, here, I ventured into the damaging region of f11.0, something never to do with tiny pixels!

I felt that it would be a tribute to her work to make pictures of flowers too. I have no easy access to wild flowers, but we always have fresh blooms from the supermarket....supplemented by flowers from my garden.




Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #01

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f11.0


Enjoy! Comment welcomed!

Asher
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post



Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #02

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f8.0


more to come!


Asher
Hello Asher

For some reason I am bothered by the table tops being part of the composition. What if you spent a little more time dressing up the table top in some way? Maybe some type of gift wrapping paper and some other flowers thrown around to try and blend the overall composition. Just my thoughts.

Best ,regards
James
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  #5  
Old April 13th, 2015, 08:33 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
Hello Asher

For some reason I am bothered by the table tops being part of the composition. What if you spent a little more time dressing up the table top in some way? Maybe some type of gift wrapping paper and some other flowers thrown around to try and blend the overall composition. Just my thoughts.

Best ,regards
James

Yes, I thought of that too, James! My wife had me return that table to my office, LOL! She's going to get me an acrylic table and I will put textured fabric over it. But, of course, I can do that anytime in Photoshop too. For now, don't let the table worry you. Thiese pretty things don't need and informed consent to be signed and I don't have to remember to tell them where the bathroom is! They are also in my house when I wake up!

Asher
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  #6  
Old April 13th, 2015, 08:40 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Yes, I thought of that too, James! My wife had me return that table to my office, LOL! She's going to get me an acrylic table and I will put textured fabric over it. But, of course, I can do that anytime in Photoshop too. For now, don't let the table worry you. Thiese pretty things don't need and informed consent to be signed and I don't have to remember to tell them where the bathroom is! They are also in my house when I wake up!

Asher
Hello Asher

I was in a flower shop the other day and I thought to myself that it might be a nice place to sleep and wake up. Especially for the increased oxygen levels and wonderful fragrance!

James
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  #7  
Old April 13th, 2015, 09:10 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
I was in a flower shop the other day and I thought to myself that it might be a nice place to sleep and wake up. Especially for the increased oxygen levels and wonderful fragrance!
Actually, plants use oxygen at night. They only produce oxygen when there is light, so it is not a good idea to sleep in a small room full of plants.
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  #8  
Old April 13th, 2015, 09:20 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Actually, plants use oxygen at night. They only produce oxygen when there is light, so it is not a good idea to sleep in a small room full of plants.
That is interesting Jerome. Maybe just a knap then and wake up in the late afternoon?

James
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  #9  
Old April 13th, 2015, 09:25 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I stood by in awe as the Curator of photographs at the Getty Museum looked at the photographs of Wild Flowers in Vases by Paul Chamlee.
Paula Chamlee is probably one of the best photographers to ever grace this forum. Her bouquets, in particular, appear deceptively simple but are not. I would not have taken up the task myself.

An important part of her images is that she manages to make everything but the bouquet and vase disappear. Elements like the table and background are obviously visible, but presented in such a way that the viewer will ignore them.

Another important part is the light. You will notice that the light is different between her classic bouquets and the more ikebana inspired compositions.

Last but not least the position of the camera, focal length and resulting perspective are not chosen by chance and she uses movements to ensure correct perspective of the vase and table.

You have picked up a very difficult task. But I seem to recall that you own a view camera, maybe now is the time to use it.
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  #10  
Old April 13th, 2015, 09:38 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Paula Chamlee is probably one of the best photographers to ever grace this forum. Her bouquets, in particular, appear deceptively simple but are not. I would not have taken up the task myself.

An important part of her images is that she manages to make everything but the bouquet and vase disappear. Elements like the table and background are obviously visible, but presented in such a way that the viewer will ignore them.

Another important part is the light. You will notice that the light is different between her classic bouquets and the more ikebana inspired compositions.

Last but not least the position of the camera, focal length and resulting perspective are not chosen by chance and she uses movements to ensure correct perspective of the vase and table.

You have picked up a very difficult task. But I seem to recall that you own a view camera, maybe now is the time to use it.
Jerome,

Thanks so much for stopping by. I appreciate your visit and comments.

Paula is indeed a star! Still stars do give light for the hunter. So that's my journey. For now, these are the views with a simple lens.

To Paula's pictures, she would spend hours in her studio arranging wild flowers as an inspiration for her other work which includes painting. Her husband, Michael A. Smith suggested to her that she photograph them.. The rest is history.

If you look again at the series of her pictures I linked to you will see that hte table is an essential part of the entire composition. Removing it would unbalance the photograph. That is a test the two of them apply to all their work. In each photograph, the table has more or less weight, but all are critical to the success. One picture demands a particularly noticeable presence of the table, as their are dropped petals on it.

My job is not to repeat her work, but to be energized by it.

At present, this is my work and there's more to follow using just the flowers we have. Later, I will work with the Canon 24mm T/S II lens for orthogonality. Film is ready in my freezer but too precious right now.

Asher
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  #11  
Old April 13th, 2015, 09:44 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Hi, Asher,



These are both exquisite! They have a very ** "classical" (perhaps "1940's") look. Very nicely executed.
**Whatever I initially typed there, my spell checker changed it to "Jewry".
The first one almost makes me say, "almost looks like a photograph".

Bravo on these marvelous works.

And my congratulations to Messrs. Steinheil of Munchen. (My late first wife used to refer to people from Munich as "Munchkins".)
Doug,

So happy you enjoy this too. Munich is a very special city for culture, architecture and engineering...and the famous Beer Garden!

Asher
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  #12  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:03 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Default Van Gogh

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  #13  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:06 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
If you look again at the series of her pictures I linked to you will see that the table is an essential part of the entire composition. Removing it would unbalance the photograph. That is a test the two of them apply to all their work. In each photograph, the table has more or less weight, but all are critical to the success. One picture demands a particularly noticeable presence of the table, as there are dropped petals on it.
I have spent a considerable amount of time looking at these pictures. I know the vase is always set on a table. What I am saying is that the picture is set in a way so that the table and background, although visible, are not seen. Of course they are there, but most people will only see the flowers. It is very clever.

The dropped petals have been disposed by hand, BTW. They are part of the device which makes the table disappear.
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  #14  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:09 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
It is "van Gogh", actually. There have been countless painters who did bouquets set in a vase on a table. I think there have not been so many photographers who tried this subject, but I may be mistaken.
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  #15  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:15 AM
Rachel McLain Rachel McLain is offline
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I love both of these, Asher! I am not even sure I could choose--possibly the second but only because I'm especially partial to tulips. The first, though, is more striking. So I won't choose. ;-)

Rach
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  #16  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:17 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
It is "van Gogh", actually. There have been countless painters who did bouquets set in a vase on a table. I think there have not been so many photographers who tried this subject, but I may be mistaken.
I like the fact that the vase is also essential to the composition thus hiding the stems.

James
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  #17  
Old April 13th, 2015, 10:48 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
This picture, James, is an excellent expression of the directives that Paula and Michael set themselves in their own work. The table here is integral to the entire composition. What's even more obvious is that Van Gogh's brush strokes integrate the substance of the table into the entire creative universe of the piece.

The intimate admixture of texture, color and form is something that makes any photograph look bland.

Asher
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  #18  
Old April 13th, 2015, 11:06 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Bouquet of flowers.

Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Fantin-Latour, Eugene Delacroix, Gustave Courbet, Edouard Manet...
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  #19  
Old April 13th, 2015, 11:20 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Bouquet of flowers.

Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Fantin-Latour, Eugene Delacroix, Gustave Courbet, Edouard Manet...

That's a feast of superlative art you share, Jerome. Thanks for raising the bar even higher. That's great, we should be humbled. That how we look up to see the full potential of what we are about to tackle.


Fabulous for inspiration. Daunting for following! Still, I will walk slowly and pick up what I gan gather that falls my way.


Asher
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  #20  
Old April 13th, 2015, 11:45 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I stood by in awe as the Curator of photographs at the Getty Museum looked at the photographs of Wild Flowers in Vases by Paul Chamlee. She always uses the lens stopped down. I, of course, almost never go beyond f 4.0 and 5.6 is aggressive. However, here, I ventured into the damaging region of f11.0, something never to do with tiny pixels!

I felt that it would be a tribute to her work to make pictures of flowers too. I have no easy access to wild flowers, but we always have fresh blooms from the supermarket....supplemented by flowers from my garden.




Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #01

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f11.0


Enjoy! Comment welcomed!

Asher
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post



Asher Kelman: Flowers by Glass Block in Southern Morning Light #02

Sony A7R, Steinheil-Munchen Cassarit 50mm 2.8 lens at f8.0


more to come!


Asher
Hello Asher

I will look forward to more of your work!

James
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  #21  
Old April 13th, 2015, 12:10 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
Hello Asher

I will look forward to more of your work!

James
Thanks, James,

With that support, I will go further!

I am not, however, going to alter the table, at this point. I just want to present the work so far. That table has been forever banned by my wife!

Asher
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  #22  
Old April 15th, 2015, 10:35 AM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Actually, plants use oxygen at night. They only produce oxygen when there is light, so it is not a good idea to sleep in a small room full of plants.
Yes, in our hospitals, they put the flowers visitors bring into the hall for the night.
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  #23  
Old April 15th, 2015, 11:34 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Actually, plants use oxygen at night. They only produce oxygen when there is light, so it is not a good idea to sleep in a small room full of plants.
Hi Jerome,

There are exceptions, though. The process used at night to bind amongst others carbon dioxide, and produce Oxygen, is known as CAM.

Cheers,
Bart
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  #24  
Old September 13th, 2015, 11:00 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Asher Kelman: Vase of Blue Bristles

Sony A7R 50mm Zeiss 1.8

3 Portrait Fields, CC 2015
Stitched in Autopano Giga 4
Nik Clarity


I hope you like the different angle.

Asher
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  #25  
Old September 14th, 2015, 02:35 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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Yes Asher... not only a different angle but also a different composition...

Very well done. Nice.
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  #26  
Old September 14th, 2015, 01:47 PM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post


Asher Kelman: Vase of Blue Bristles

Sony A7R 50mm Zeiss 1.8

3 Portrait Fields, CC 2015
Stitched in Autopano Giga 4
Nik Clarity


I hope you like the different angle.

Asher
I like to cool tones and the geometry of the composition but I can't see the image in it's entirety with out scrolling up and down. However it appears that it has been shot at a downward angle as apposed to eye level. I thought that a crop part way up the bottom box might improve things and allow the composition to float in the surrounding negative space.
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  #27  
Old September 14th, 2015, 02:57 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
I like to cool tones and the geometry of the composition but I can't see the image in it's entirety with out scrolling up and down. However it appears that it has been shot at a downward angle as apposed to eye level. I thought that a crop part way up the bottom box might improve things and allow the composition to float in the surrounding negative space.
Hmm,

On my iPhone 6 it fits just perfectly. Also on an iMac. I tried to make it has large as possible.

Yes it was shot downwards!

Still, James, your here's a cropped version as you requested!




Asher Kelman: Blue Thistle

Cropped for James


I hope this works for you!

Asher
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