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  #1  
Old November 9th, 2015, 07:58 PM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Default Starting out to do street photography from scratch!

I have always loved to do the nitty gritty photography. I see a begger at the intersection and if I can take a picture of the person. I love to take pictures of the police in action, firefighters in action, EMS in action. I am wanting to work on my photography both still life and street photography. I want to be as good at Street Photography and still life photography as Robert, Maggie, Asher, Doug, and all the others here. Just like I have been doing with the still life with Asher, Robert, and Maggie I put myself in every-bodies hands. I want to learn and I want to be the best I can be not just a so and so who takes a decent photo every once in a while. So please tell me what you think.

As everybody who I have been working with knows I finally moved away from the GE x600 to a Canon EOS Rebel T5 DSLR with a 18mm to 55mm lens. I went out Saturday to learn my new camera and see what I could capture. While I was at the Mirage Hotel and Casino trying to get the perfect Waterfall photo there was a accident not 50 feet from me. Since I belong to a fire photography site and love anything that has to do with the Fire Service I naturally took a bunch of photos.

After they made sure that there wasn't injuries the fire department was getting ready to leave and they were sitting in the intersection and I thought this was a classic photo when I took it of just how much people never pay attention to what is really going on around them.

This is the UN-edited photo.



And this is the one that posted on the firefighting site that I belong too. I cropped out a lot of the useless stuff in the photo, and I say useless because those that are on these sites do not want to hotel stuff and the scenery around the rigs and scene for the most part.



Any and all comment are welcome. I want to learn.
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  #2  
Old November 9th, 2015, 08:49 PM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Here is one that I sent to Asher to see what he thought of it and what I could do to improve what I was shooting.

This was taken on the East portion of Fremont Street. This is a area of homeless, drug addicts, drunks, etc.. It is also a area of shuttered motels, the type that asked no questions if you wanted a room for an hour or a day.

This motel has been sitting vacant for over a year and it is one that myself, my ex-wife, and her son stayed at for a few weeks when I came to Vegas the first time in 2004.



This is one that I sent to Asher. I cropped it again as I would for the fire photography sites and as an artistic touch I also did it in Black and White.



Below is what Asher told me to do. I am adding his advise and suggestion so that everybody realizes that I am working with him and wanting to learn and to be the best that I can be.

Re: Working with my new camera
Repeat the picture dropping down so you are some 3 ft from the f
Ground and make sure you get the bottom of the building and the top of the lamp posts and the entire cross walk black and white markings.

Gradually move to the right to take the corner at progressive positions and then show them.

Don't worry about B&W for now, Dave, just the taking position and wgmhat's included.

This, BTW is harder than the rose and berry on the black by as there is a lot goin on. Just watch out for traffic.

Kudos on your new camera. Just set it to f8.0 and your focus will be fine with the camera set to AV.

Does your camera gmgave AUTO ISO?

That would be a great idea, otherwise use 400 800 or 1600 ISO to keep the shutter speed above 150!

Good luck on your mission.

If you are caught, the secret service will deny all knowledge of this operation!

Asher
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  #3  
Old November 9th, 2015, 08:59 PM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Here are a few other photos that I took while I was out on Saturday. Please be honest with me. I worked very hard but I want to know what everybody has to say. I want to learn.



In the photo above I was working on trying to get the Dolphins in focus and the waterfall to look like a solid sheet of water. I was hoping that the rest was in focus. Any suggestions on how to accomplish that.

Below is the information on the shot.

Camera Canon EOS REBEL T5
ISO 100
Focal Length 55mm
Aperture f/36
Exposure Time 1s (1/1)
Name IMG_0695.JPG
Size 5184 x 3456
Date Taken 2015-11-07 11:59:26
Date Modified 2015-11-07 16:42:15
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  #4  
Old November 9th, 2015, 09:02 PM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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Dave, Looks like you had a fun day.

I'm not a street photographer in any sense, but I have a few things that I think could help.

On the first one, I really think it was a good idea, that you cropped the bottom.. the shadow was not interesting and it didn't bring anything to the image. I do think though, that perhaps on top, although a bit of a crop is okay, that you cropped too much. It's a very busy image and the bridge being so close to the top after the crop doesn't give it any place to breathe. If you don't want to show what the commercial buildings are, then crop just above the FRANK name, as that is interesting and gives the image a bit of air on top of the bridge.

The second thing I would do is straighten the image. It feels a little tilted to me. There is a ruler in photoshop (click on the arrow of the eyedropper tool and you ll find it there) and pull a vertical line either on a building or one of the posts on the bridge. Then if you go into IMAGE/ADJUSTMENT and click on IMAGE ROTATION (something like that), and rotation arbitrary, it will fill in the amount it needs rotation and if you click okay, it will rotate it for you. Actually, you should do the rotation before you do the other crop.

As a final note, to me although this is in the street, I would consider this more of a journalistic image, because it is not really about the people walking in the street but about the event of the firetruck going to a fire.
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  #5  
Old November 9th, 2015, 09:13 PM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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As for the second image, again like the first, it needs a rotation to straighten it. I think you could have left a bit more of the street too. I think the black and white looks pretty good too.

For the third image of the dolphins, You need to set your ISO much higher, because at F36, you have a small hole open only and not much light gets in. So your camera, decided it would take an image that would last a whole second and what happened is a whole second is a long time to hold a shot without any movement. It's quite slow. You even have a bit of over-exposure because of it. If you want the water to look soft and silky instead of all water drops all over the place, you may want to use a polarizing filter and a tripod, which will definitely help.

I'm sure others will give you more info as they do a lot of street photography, but I thought I'd chime in and let you know that I'm watching and interested.

:-)
Maggie

p.s. So glad you are enjoying your new hobby!
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  #6  
Old November 9th, 2015, 09:15 PM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Below are some more that I took of the Waterfalls at the Mirage. In all of these I was working on making them look more like this that those that I took a month or so ago.

Here are the ones that I took Saturday.







This one was the hardest of all of them to get what I thought was the best. I had to take and re take and take again some were washed out and some were too dark and many were very out of focus. After I think about thirty tries this what I came up with.



This is the last one that I took that I want to share today. This is also another one that I took a lot of to try and get just perfect.



I look forward to what everybody has to say and suggest.
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  #7  
Old November 9th, 2015, 10:24 PM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggie Terlecki View Post
Dave, Looks like you had a fun day.

I'm not a street photographer in any sense, but I have a few things that I think could help.

On the first one, I really think it was a good idea, that you cropped the bottom.. the shadow was not interesting and it didn't bring anything to the image. I do think though, that perhaps on top, although a bit of a crop is okay, that you cropped too much. It's a very busy image and the bridge being so close to the top after the crop doesn't give it any place to breathe. If you don't want to show what the commercial buildings are, then crop just above the FRANK name, as that is interesting and gives the image a bit of air on top of the bridge.

The second thing I would do is straighten the image. It feels a little tilted to me. There is a ruler in photoshop (click on the arrow of the eyedropper tool and you ll find it there) and pull a vertical line either on a building or one of the posts on the bridge. Then if you go into IMAGE/ADJUSTMENT and click on IMAGE ROTATION (something like that), and rotation arbitrary, it will fill in the amount it needs rotation and if you click okay, it will rotate it for you. Actually, you should do the rotation before you do the other crop.

As a final note, to me although this is in the street, I would consider this more of a journalistic image, because it is not really about the people walking in the street but about the event of the firetruck going to a fire.
Thank you Maggie like Asher and Robert I trust your opinion and your thoughts and suggestions. For one reason and one reason only. Like Robert and Asher you are not out to tear me down but to help me become the best I can be. To me Street Photography is both capturing everyday people being themselves and photos like this one. Everyday street photography is like this one below. I was in the process of taking photos of the waterfalls at the Mirage and this group of people wanted to take a photo with me in it and I told them I would love to get a photo of them and they all agreed. To me this is also photo journalism because it is the reality of Las Vegas, drunk tourist. Sorry don't mean to offend anybody.



Here is a corrected crop of the photo that you are helping me with.



And your very right I did cut too much off above the bridge and it looks better this way. Showing the strip and one of the major hotel/casinos on the strip.



I did straighten the photo and went to do it in Photoshop and the only option, if I am doing it right, to straighten the photo was in crop.



The way I did the straighten was in Microsoft Live Photo Gallery. You can see the Straighten button on the toolbar.



I will do the straighten in the future Maggie. Once again thank you for what you are teaching me.
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  #8  
Old November 10th, 2015, 07:37 AM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggie Terlecki View Post
As for the second image, again like the first, it needs a rotation to straighten it. I think you could have left a bit more of the street too. I think the black and white looks pretty good too.

For the third image of the dolphins, You need to set your ISO much higher, because at F36, you have a small hole open only and not much light gets in. So your camera, decided it would take an image that would last a whole second and what happened is a whole second is a long time to hold a shot without any movement. It's quite slow. You even have a bit of over-exposure because of it. If you want the water to look soft and silky instead of all water drops all over the place, you may want to use a polarizing filter and a tripod, which will definitely help.

I'm sure others will give you more info as they do a lot of street photography, but I thought I'd chime in and let you know that I'm watching and interested.

:-)
Maggie

p.s. So glad you are enjoying your new hobby!
I actually have a polarize filter on the way it should be here in the next few days. It is coming with a new tripod and a few other things for the camera. I was talking with one of the guys from a firefighting photography site that lives out here in vegas and he stated that when he takes photos of the fires and fire equipment he has one on his camera. He uses it to cut down on the glare and all from the chrome on the rigs. I plan on being out again this weekend and reshooting the water falls with the tripod and the polirizing filter and will post those.
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  #9  
Old November 10th, 2015, 08:09 AM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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Dave, Photoshop has several tools that can be used to straighten an image. The crop tool can be used, as well as the transform tool. Sometimes in an image, it can be difficult to eyeball how to straighten and using the ruler is a way to select something in the image that you know to be straight such as a lamppost and pull a line along it. Then the program will actually rotate it for you and in the right direction.

I've made a quick sketch:
1- the ruler tool under the eye-dropper
2- pull a line (drag and pull) using the eyedropper along something in your image that you know is straight. It is difficult to see the line here, so I put a bit of a red marker beside it
3- Go into Image, Image Rotation and Arbitrary.
4- The program will already have put in the settings and all you have to do is click okay.

You would only use this if you have trouble eyeballing the image. In the image you used, there is so much going on; it can sometimes be difficult to see how straight it is. The ruler takes the guessing away.

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  #10  
Old November 10th, 2015, 08:57 AM
Robert Watcher Robert Watcher is offline
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I'll go back to what I have said and implied in previous posts of your outdoor photos, Dave. You are 'seeing' your surroundings as most people see, and have an idea in your head that you think you are projecting in your images ----- but you are not seeing photographically. That applies to your content, composition and lighting. These are all fundamentals and are the difference between everyday snapshots and photographs that people would hang on their walls or magazines would purchase for their pages. That said - if that is what you want from your photography, who am I to disagree or duscourage you.

But if you are seriously wanting to make photographs that others can appreciate, please don't spend excessive time or money trying to figure out how you can change or correct things in Photoshop or by purchasing more gear such as a polorizing filter. It will make little to no difference in your results at this point in time ----- at least until you have gotten to a point where your photographs are compelling, and then you can use those tools or more gear to move to another level.

I really have little difference in my advice from your what I commented on with your last pics of what you are calling street photography. And that is to practice and practice and practice photography basics and focus on making images that will cause people to want to look at them because they are lit well, focused well, composed well and have compelling content.

You are not at a stage in your photography where you can 'tell a story' with your photos. The photos you are showing are not photojournalistic. That is not because you may not possess the ability at some time with much practice and dedication - but at this point it is not there.

I know you would like us on the forum to direct you after every new set of images that you take. That is common with people trying to learn. But it can't really happen. There will be a large gap in time between significant improvements in your photography - and that will best come by analyzing your pics yourself to see where you want to make improvements and putting that into action. You alone are the one who has to train yourself to be aware of what needs to be done to improve.

Look at other people's photos that you like and try to emulate that, read books or web content about Basic Photography, shoot analyze and shoot again with changes, and of course ask - but maybe instead of asking general questions based on a bunch of your photographs - ask specific questions based on roadblocks you are hitting with your increased understanding and maybe including a photo to show what you are talking about. Just a suggestion of course.

Once you are sure that that you've make some major headway, then it is easier for experienced ones to look at older work and compare to the new and see your direction and give suggestions on refinements. I encourage you to keep posting your photos on the forum as you go along. That is what the forum is provided for. But please don't get discouraged because your expectations of specific feedback or even help you want from specific members, won't be met. As you post your pics, if I see something in your work that catches my eye - or see potential that can be aided with a few words of advice - I will freely feel impelled to let you know.

Last edited by Robert Watcher; November 10th, 2015 at 12:08 PM.
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Old November 10th, 2015, 11:53 AM
Robert Watcher Robert Watcher is offline
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So in order to be a little more helpful to you Dave...

.... Perhaps it would be of more benefit if you use a Google Search on a phrase such as 'composition and technique' . There appears to be lots of information that is organized and is going to be much more useful then any opinions that you will get on the forum.

As an example Doing such a search I noticed this webpage with some valuable instruction: http://photography.tutsplus.com/arti...os--photo-7978 ----! But do your own search and come up with your own results that direct you in the path you want to go. But in my opinion basics of lighting, composition and technique are your starting points. Even after years of shooting, I revisit books or information on basics all of the time.

You see - once you have applied some of these fundamentals in your photography, you can come back to us and ask if the way that you are using them is correct or useful in a specific image. Then, opinions and advice may be useful and the feedback valuable to move you on.
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Old November 10th, 2015, 02:29 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Dave,

much has been written already, here is a short form of my view.

Try to imagine the picture before you take it.

Ask yourself:
- What compositional choice?
- Is this situation what you want to capture?
- Observer or part of the situation?

Your new camera is your new toy, but it must become an efficient tool that does not stand between you and the desired result. This needs time, work and learning from errors.

Street is not my main focus, so these might not be the best examples, but I hope that these will serve as inspiration.

Strong lines:





Situation:





Minimalism:




Best regards,
Michael
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Old November 10th, 2015, 05:30 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is online now
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Hi, Michael,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Dave,

much has been written already, here is a short form of my view.

Try to imagine the picture before you take it.

Ask yourself:
- What compositional choice?
- Is this situation what you want to capture?
- Observer or part of the situation?
Note that we have earlier been taught here by another member that:

One must visualize the picture as it will ultimately appear on a print (not in any other form, which would not be a photograph anyway).

To do this, one can only do the composition while viewing the scene through an optical viewfinder (not ever an electronic viewfinder).

No, of course I never believed any of that.

Best regards,

Doug
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Old November 11th, 2015, 01:04 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Hi Doug,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Note that we have earlier been taught here by another member that:

One must visualize the picture as it will ultimately appear on a print (not in any other form, which would not be a photograph anyway).

To do this, one can only do the composition while viewing the scene through an optical viewfinder (not ever an electronic viewfinder).

No, of course I never believed any of that.
Then I suppose you remember somehow my take on it.

There was no optical viewfinder involved in the three pictures shown, but this is pure coincidence.

The camera is the tool - the one who wields it must see what he wants to capture and use the tool, however it is made, well.

Best regards,
Michael
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Old November 11th, 2015, 01:18 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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I am not exactly sure what you are trying to achieve. Can you help me a bit and tell me what kind of pictures you want to take? What do you want to show and to whom?

You may not have a definitive answer at present, but you certainly have some ideas on what you want to achieve. This forum will help you considerably more if you tell us what it is.
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Old November 11th, 2015, 03:58 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is online now
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Hi, Michael,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Then I suppose you remember somehow my take on it.
I do indeed.

I was just pulling everybody's leg!

Best regards,

Doug
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  #17  
Old November 12th, 2015, 08:49 AM
Dave Butcher Dave Butcher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Watcher View Post
So in order to be a little more helpful to you Dave...

.... Perhaps it would be of more benefit if you use a Google Search on a phrase such as 'composition and technique' . There appears to be lots of information that is organized and is going to be much more useful then any opinions that you will get on the forum.

As an example Doing such a search I noticed this webpage with some valuable instruction: http://photography.tutsplus.com/arti...os--photo-7978 ----! But do your own search and come up with your own results that direct you in the path you want to go. But in my opinion basics of lighting, composition and technique are your starting points. Even after years of shooting, I revisit books or information on basics all of the time.

You see - once you have applied some of these fundamentals in your photography, you can come back to us and ask if the way that you are using them is correct or useful in a specific image. Then, opinions and advice may be useful and the feedback valuable to move you on.

Thank you Robert these are great and fantastic information.
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  #18  
Old November 22nd, 2015, 10:14 AM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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Hello Dave.

I have been doing photography for a long time. The only thing I have gained from it all is experience.
Not necessarily nice images.

But something that started me off was this most important realization for me.

Photograph what interests you. Keep at it.

As to the technical side of things; my experience has been that setting the camera to auto mode, works
90% of the time.

Keep at it. With what interests you. For 90% of the time.

The subject should be your one and only focus ( ! ). What, how, where, when. The 90% shall gradually teach you that.

Focus on the subjects that interest you. What is it that you find interesting about it. Capture it. Show it to us.

That which interests you. We too are interested in it.

The remaining 10% is the easy part.
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