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  #61  
Old October 19th, 2007, 09:46 AM
Jessica Eldredge Jessica Eldredge is offline
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I haven't looked at these in B&W yet at all. I'll have to go back to those images and see what I can come up with. Thanks for the suggestion.
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  #62  
Old October 22nd, 2007, 05:05 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default Armenian Woman Captured my Heart!

My camera seems linked to my heart. Some people have some emotional sensitivity and warmth, they seem to radiate positive energy.
So I started to photograph her and then explained. This is her picture.


© 2007 Asher Kelman (Do not copy or download)

I try to use my 50 1.2L on my Canon 5D as I then can exploit available light, which is my preference. There is no attempt crop, clone to alter skin or lavish "perfection" on someone who is beautiful to look at. I didn't sharpen, although before printing I would, just a little!

I hope you enjoy her portrait as I do!

Asher
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  #63  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 02:48 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I hope you enjoy her portrait as I do!
Very nice! The frontal 'pose' immediately connects, and make the viewer wonder what her thoughts are.
The only distracting element is the highlight above her head, I'd clone it out (or tone down and blur).

Focus and DOF seem close to perfect (maybe slightly front focused), although tricky to judge at this size.
Which aperture did you use?

Bart
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  #64  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 03:03 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart_van_der_Wolf View Post
Very nice! The frontal 'pose' immediately connects, and make the viewer wonder what her thoughts are.
The only distracting element is the highlight above her head, I'd clone it out (or tone down and blur).

Focus and DOF seem close to perfect (maybe slightly front focused), although tricky to judge at this size.
Which aperture did you use?

Bart
Yes Bart,

Frontal is great! She was one lovely woman to photograph. Having my wife there might have helped!!

I try to use the lens wide open. In fact, I did! It was F 1.2, 1/395 sec, ISO 200. What a nice lens!

I'll clone out the light as you suggest before printing. It's kind of you to comment. I appreciate that. This picture really gives me a great feeling that I'm getting back to simpler photography.

Asher
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  #65  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 06:16 AM
Clayton Lofgren Clayton Lofgren is offline
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I've been back to look at her a dozen times and am sure I will visit her again. Intriguing.
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  #66  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 07:36 AM
Arya Wiese Arya Wiese is offline
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This is an image of my dad while we were playing some sort of dice game. He was talking to my husband (the blur) when I snaped this real quick.


I can't remember what my iso was at.
Flash used: No
Focal length: 50.0mm (35mm equivalent: 75mm)
Exposure time: 0.0056 s (1/180)
Aperture: f/1.8
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  #67  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 10:51 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arya Wiese View Post
This is an image of my dad while we were playing some sort of dice game. He was talking to my husband (the blur) when I snaped this real quick.
What a warm picture, Arya! You have captures the very generous smile that is not just internal but transmissive. This is a special empathetic human moment. In it there is quiet joy and bonding. I like the angle of his head and pearing over his spectacles, showing that to plat the game he had to put them forward to focus. So this says he is looking up from something he was closely following. Again a prefect detail.

I like the tonality. Here, IMHO, color likely adds nothing. However, I say that not to be contraversial, but the picture is so integrated and full of meaning just with the spread of tonalities in gray scale.

How did you do the conversion?

Asher
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  #68  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 10:55 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton Lofgren View Post
I've been back to look at her a dozen times and am sure I will visit her again. Intriguing.
Thanks for your so kind words Calayton. Yes she is very special! I hope to make contact again with her when I revisit San Francisco. We say we'll do this with strangers, but how often do we actually seek them out again?

Asher
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  #69  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 12:16 PM
Eric Hiss Eric Hiss is offline
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Default Here are two

Siegfried

Tony

took the last one with the 5D at iso 3200 with the 135mm f/2 lens at f/2.8.

critiques welcome but please do not download/edit my images
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; December 13th, 2009 at 01:43 PM.
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  #70  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 01:08 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Hi Eric,

I'm so pleased you added your work to this collection! The first picture is archtypical of pride in achievement. Children first do that when realizing that they have formed somerthing special in the toilet and at the same time exerted independence and then said "Good bye!" as it flushes away. Here there is a certain triviality in showing the plate, Look I finished the sorbet (??) ans see there's an interesting pattern to show you, at the same time realizing that it must be discarded. Still, there is some glow of pride at the same time questioning that you really believe it's worth photographing.

If not for the color in the plate, I'd wonder perhaps if it might be better in B&W since his red scalp is distracting. I postulate the color can distract from global ideas. Also, I'd consider increasing hte saturation and or contrast of the streaks on the plate. Still, unchanged the picture is impressive and transmits its message if what I have said has any bearing whatsoever on the truth!

The second image is, of course so different yet it still is actively reaching out to you, the photographer. Is that light from a window on his hair plus a box high on camera left? looks like he's a friend of yours as so comfortable with you. You have detailed his hair well. The face is well drawn except that there is a lot of detail in this rich image that is not optimally shown, IMHO. A very slight drop in an S curve will make the blacks richer and bring out detail in the face. However this adjustment, although important, to my view, is very minor. Still, there's optimizing for viewing it and it's another matter getting the print. Still, I'd think that the dynamic range of the image could be compressed a little.

Thanks, Eric for two interesting pictures!

Asher
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; October 23rd, 2007 at 03:06 PM.
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  #71  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 02:23 PM
Arya Wiese Arya Wiese is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
What a warm picture, Arya! You have captures the very generous smile that is not just internal but transmissive. This is a special empathetic human moment. In it there is quiet joy and bonding. I like the angle of his head and pearing over his spectacles, showing that to plat the game he had to put them forward to focus. So this says he is looking up from something he was closely following. Again a prefect detail.

I like the tonality. Here, IMHO, color likely adds nothing. However, I say that not to be contraversial, but the picture is so integrated and full of meaning just with the spread of tonalities in gray scale.

How did you do the conversion?

Asher
Hi Asher,
I used a gradiant layer, adjusting it to the depth that I wanted then used the brightness contrast to bring out a bit more detail and used both the dodge and burn tool - everything on it's own layer and then I flattened it and sharpened to taste. It really is one of my favorites of my dad, it's sooo him.

btw I use photoshop cs2 for all my editing, if that makes a difference.
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  #72  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 02:47 PM
Eric Hiss Eric Hiss is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Hi Eric,

I'm so pleased you added your work to this collection! The first picture is archtypical of pride in achievement. Children first do that when realizing that they have formed somerthing special in the toilet and at the same time exerted independance and then said good by as it flushes away. Here there is a certain triviality in showing the plate, Look I finished the sorbet (??) ans see there's an interesting pattern to show you, at the same time realizing that it must be discarded. Still, there is some glow of pride at the same time questioning that you really believe it's worth photographing.

If not for the color in the plate, I'd wonder perhaps if it might be better in B&W since his red scalp is distracting. I postulate the color can distract from global ideas. Also, I'd consider increasing hte saturation and or contrast of the streaks on the plate. Still, unchanged the picture is impressive and transmits its message if what I have said has any bearing whatsoever on the truth!

The second image is, of course so different yet it still is actively reaching out to you, the photographer. Is that light from a window on his hair plus a box high on camera left? looks like he's a friend of yours as so comfortable with you. You have detailed his hair well. The face is well drawn except that there is a lot of detail in this rich image that is not optimally shown, IMHO. A very slight drop in an S curve will make the blacks richer and bring out detail in the face. However this adjustment, although important, to my view, is very minor. Still, there's optimizing for viewing it and it's another matter getting the print. Still, I'd think that the dynamic range of the image could be compressed a little.

Thanks, Eric for two interesting pictures!

Asher
Asher,
These are grab shots no external light used - those lights are the lights in my home. I positioned the camera so they would be behind his head and he is lit frontally by a floor lamp behind me. It wouldn't be fair to post studio images to your grab challenge now would it?

I also find your analogy of the first picture a bit hilarious and also a bit off putting. If that were you in the picture would you really want people making a reference to toilet training? If I were a moderator here at OPF, I'd have to ban you for that. :-) btw- that picture was hung in the Hotel Des Arts here in San Francisco as part of an exhibition called SF Faces. The color is accurate - if you see too much red check your monitor profile.

The second picture shows well at larger resolutions and prints well - probably a bit too sharp in the web version. I converted to the toned image because I think it shows better - at iso 3200 there is a bit of noise, and I don't like to take it out with the noise removal tools because I don't like the plastic look that heavily processed images get when handled that way. The canon 135mm is one of their better lenses - very sharp at or near maximum aperture. No offense, but I'll skip your suggestion for curves - I have adjusted it to my preference already. Just FYI when you use an S curve you are increasing image contrast, not affecting dynamic range.
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  #73  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 02:52 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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[QUOTE=Arya Wiese;37315]Hi Asher,
I used a gradiant layer, adjusting it to the depth that I wanted then used the brig

Hi Arya,

Even CS 1.0 is still perfectly competant for anyone who is learning to process their photography. Now I would suggest you try to avoid jumping to brightness and contrast. Using levels is much more controlable. Then you can select the areas you want to change. Save each selection and label "top of head", "glasses" and so forth. Then each part can be modified accordingly and it' percent contribution can be fine tuned as you will have linked each adjustment layer to just one part of the image. Make sure that each selection is feathered.

In any case, what you did worked very well and I didn't notice any changes you made!! The picture works perfectly!

Asher
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  #74  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 03:02 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Hiss View Post
Asher,
I also find your analogy of the first picture a bit hilarious and also a bit off putting. If that were you in the picture would you really want people making a reference to toilet training? If I were a moderator here at OPF, I'd have to ban you for that. :-) btw- that picture was hung in the Hotel Des Arts here in San Francisco as part of an exhibition called SF Faces. The color is accurate - if you see too much red check your monitor profile.
I guess Eric that I'm a romanitc father observing behaviors that sometimes become foundations for pride and creativity. That concept is not my original idea and I must admit, TTBOMK, it "smells" of Freudian thought, although I actually reject that as a basis for any actual medical reatments.Yes, it's hilarious to make such connections but not meant in any wat to dis' your impressive picture! I commented as I did on the plate picture since it is more important than a picture of a guy with a plate. Was this indeed sorbet?

As far as banning, yes, you are right, I should be banned for not seeming nice to yopur picture, but if you reread what I have written, I think your picture is important. Now what really happened?

I don't know how to ban myself! That is something that I'll have to put under consideration!

The lighting of the second picture, I guess flummexed me! I forgot for the moment that thread it was in so the possible presence of a strobe did not bother me!

Ciao,

Asher
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  #75  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 03:22 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
The second image is, of course so different yet it still is actively reaching out to you, the photographer. Is that light from a window on his hair plus a box high on camera left? looks like he's a friend of yours as so comfortable with you. You have detailed his hair well. The face is well drawn except that there is a lot of detail in this rich image that is not optimally shown, IMHO. A very slight drop in an S curve will make the blacks richer and bring out detail in the face. (underlined and emphasized in quoting). However this adjustment, although important, to my view, is very minor. Still, there's optimizing for viewing it and it's another matter getting the print. Still, I'd think that the dynamic range of the image could be compressed a little.

Thanks, Eric for two interesting pictures!

Asher
So note I wrote lowering an s cruve!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Hiss View Post
Asher,
The second picture shows well at larger resolutions and prints well - probably a bit too sharp in the web version. I converted to the toned image because I think it shows better - at iso 3200 there is a bit of noise, and I don't like to take it out with the noise removal tools because I don't like the plastic look that heavily processed images get when handled that way. The canon 135mm is one of their better lenses - very sharp at or near maximum aperture. No offense, but I'll skip your suggestion for curves - I have adjusted it to my preference already. Just FYI when you use an S curve you are increasing image contrast, not affecting dynamic range.
The misunderstanding, Eric is that whereas a simple S curve will not per se alter the dynamic range, but dropping an S curve where the bright end would be lowered from 255 to about 235 or so, will decrease the dynamic range! So that is what I meant and is something to consider. However, as I pointed out, this would be a minor change and then one swould add only a small percentage of that adjustment layer. The picture is perfectly fine! I'm not saying it needs any change just that a tad of a dropped curve would bring out details in the bright cheek. :)

When you print, depending on the paper, you might even change your current setting anyway!

Kindest wishes,

Asher
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  #76  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 04:31 PM
Eric Hiss Eric Hiss is offline
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yeah agreed, for a lot of subjects you almost need to make different edits for screen and print, and I'm not just thinking about sharpness but also contrast and color. No real point in getting to a technical discussion about editing in this thread - but if you adjust the white point from 255 to 235 you are not using a curve at all, and yes you will compress the image.
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  #77  
Old October 23rd, 2007, 08:37 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Hi Eric,

I agree we do not want to divert off to a new subject. Still, for completeness, what I'm suggesting as a concept is really straightforward. I do is make an S curve and drop the entire S curve with a lower white point. That way the dynamic range is reduced, the tonalities are reassigned and contrast is increased.

That's the end of the story. Maybe I need to better describe what I mean by "dropping the S-curve", since this is my own idiosynchratic terminology! :)

If I can find the appropriate examples, I'll make this a new thread.

Now back to portraits. The man with the plate is one of my favorites!

Asher
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  #78  
Old October 24th, 2007, 12:06 AM
Eric Hiss Eric Hiss is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Hi Eric,



Now back to portraits. The man with the plate is one of my favorites!

Asher
You certainly can buy a print of it if you like! He's part of a big series of my artwork called, Life Decisions. I'm doing lots of other stuff but that one subject has me captivated.

Well just one more comment on the adjustments - I am thinking that I must be misunderstanding what you are suggesting because what I think you are saying will make a big white spot that separates itself from the rest of the image on a print. Better start a new thread and put up some screen grabs of your curves adjustments or something. I guess you could also save your curves adj and make it available. I'd rather you don't use my image as the guinea pig though.
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  #79  
Old October 24th, 2007, 12:42 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Hiss View Post
Well just one more comment on the adjustments - I am thinking that I must be misunderstanding what you are suggesting because what I think you are saying will make a big white spot that separates itself from the rest of the image on a print. Better start a new thread and put up some screen grabs of your curves adjustments or something. I guess you could also save your curves adj and make it available. I'd rather you don't use my image as the guinea pig though.
Yes you are correct in being perplexed by your misunderstanding of my "dropping an S-curve"! We'll just have to pursue this in a new thread with new examples as this procedure has value.

Now you never did disclose what was in that paper plate?

Asher
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  #80  
Old April 16th, 2008, 08:10 PM
Jim Galli Jim Galli is offline
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Looks like this thread has been resting quietly. I was happy with this grab. Do you grab with a 7X11" film camera? Actually, I had just finished another shot, saw the light on Tom, swung the Eastman his direction, and had it done in less than a minute.


Tom Perkins

Tom and I were shooting together in an old foundry in Tonopah, NV.
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  #81  
Old April 16th, 2008, 08:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Hi Jim,

What a wonderful surprise and delight. Good thing you had film loaded. I'd love to know how you get 7x11 film and what lens you used and aperture.

My comments: (Sticking my neck out since I did not conceive of nor make this picture):

I like the soft background and the feeling of a vast studio/workspace and attention of Tom to his camera. The face may be less sharp than the camera and cloth. Still, the picture works, but then why?

First, grossly, what do we see? This image has a two vertical columns, a gradient of light grays on the left and a gradient of darkness on the right linked together by one irregular "jigsaw" piece: Tom and his camera!

I'll write more, but for now let me comment that I find the picture dynamic. If one believes in the rule of thirds, then the active point is Tom's light meter or loupe. Then there is clockwise whirl of interest around this center going from his right hand, arm and swing round at his head, pulling us powerfully towards the camera, which is, itself, pointing back towards him. However, this composition, alone, would appear "unbalanced" since the tripod below is a "dead" structure with not even a quiver of movement. So what makes the picture have such good balance?

I think it's the highly reflective an specular bright camera viewing hood which has the power to take the thrust of movement from the left.

The darkness all around above and to the right is perfect. If we listened to the gurus I'd like to yell at, and framed and cropped close, this picture would have been neutered

Thanks for sharing. Wow, if I may say!

Asher
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  #82  
Old April 17th, 2008, 12:08 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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hmmmm!

Geeezzze! that's a real Black and White atmosphere! the lighting is gorgeous and beautifully captured!
Asher can attest that this statement is very rare from me for B&W - which BTW IS a photograph, not simply a picture…

would love to see a 100% crop of the scan…
The man's head or the tripod's head? even both ???

Thanks in advance
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  #83  
Old April 18th, 2008, 09:26 AM
Jim Galli Jim Galli is offline
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Thanks Asher and Nicolas. The lens used was an ancient Bausch & Lomb 24" (yes, 610mm) magic lantern projector lens. It is a petzval and since it was for a projector it has no place for aperture control. Petzvals of course are sharp in the center and then transition very quickly to rather lovely bokeh. With the bellows extension I estimated about f14. With this type lens you find your one sharp spot and let the chips fall where they may so to speak. I recall using the black lens on the camera as that point. Film was HP5 so exposure was only 1/4 second done with a black card in front of the lens. I scanned the neg at 360 so a fairly tight crop is still small enough to post OK.


Thanks again for the comments.

Last edited by Jim Galli; April 18th, 2008 at 10:00 AM.
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  #84  
Old April 20th, 2008, 09:41 PM
Will Thompson Will Thompson is offline
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Greetings Jim, and Welcome to OPF.

I really like your grab shot of Tom Perkins.

It is so cool to see you post some of your large format stuff here.
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  #85  
Old April 21st, 2008, 12:50 AM
Arya Wiese Arya Wiese is offline
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I just love this thread - everyone's images are so full of life and emotion.









Here is a few images that I took of my mom and my daughter during our last outting to the park. She loves to make the kids smile and laugh and she does a great job of it too. But she is quick and sometimes I have to be quicker. Her grandbabies just think she is the best nana ever.
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  #86  
Old April 21st, 2008, 05:12 PM
Clayton Lofgren Clayton Lofgren is offline
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I've been going through a dry spell. My work has taken me to the desert in Tunisia, so no kids to shoot there. Am back on break in Venezuela, and found these at a roadside barbecue joint yesterday.


[IMG][/IMG]


[IMG][/IMG]


[IMG][/IMG]


[IMG][/IMG]


All with KM5D and Sigma 24-135

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  #87  
Old April 24th, 2008, 12:32 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Originally Posted by Jim Galli View Post
Thanks Asher and Nicolas. The lens used was an ancient Bausch & Lomb 24" (yes, 610mm) magic lantern projector lens. It is a petzval and since it was for a projector it has no place for aperture control. Petzvals of course are sharp in the center and then transition very quickly to rather lovely bokeh. With the bellows extension I estimated about f14. With this type lens you find your one sharp spot and let the chips fall where they may so to speak. I recall using the black lens on the camera as that point. Film was HP5 so exposure was only 1/4 second done with a black card in front of the lens. I scanned the neg at 360 so a fairly tight crop is still small enough to post OK
I love the idea that one can use the apparent defects of the lens to be expressive! Today's obsession with even illumination and no distortion at the periphery robs us of the creative use of the countless lenses each with their own character.

Thanks your little green men who find them for you!

Asher

BTW. Would this 610mm and the ~460mm lens fit on a sinar lensboard?
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  #88  
Old April 24th, 2008, 12:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Clayton,

I simply love your photography of children. You seem to have drunk water from the same well as Loretta Lux except you do not need at distort reality or stage the kids in your images. There's something I feel of her magic in your portraits of children.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton Lofgren View Post
I've been going through a dry spell. My work has taken me to the desert in Tunisia, so no kids to shoot there. Am back on break in Venezuela, and found these at a roadside barbecue joint yesterday.


[IMG][/IMG]
Click on the image to view this beautiful image larger!

I thought I'd point out that this is the Konica Minolta Maxxum 5Dfrom 2005! It's the grand father of the new Sony alpha cameras which now inherit much of KM technology. Already they had anti-shake in-camera technology! It's a 6MP camera and very capable.


Imaging Resource.com photo Entire Review.

Prices on eBay can be as low as $200! Here's one with a Tamron AF28-80mm F/3.5-5.6 lens.
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; December 13th, 2009 at 01:43 PM.
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  #89  
Old April 24th, 2008, 12:58 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Originally Posted by Arya Wiese View Post
.......... my mom and my daughter during our last outting to the park. She loves to make the kids smile and laugh..

This Style, Arya, not only will be treasured by your family, but also tells of the richness of close family ties. Most "snap shots" in family shoe boxes or albums have memories. Yours are funny too and mean a lot to the rest of us, grandparents especially!

Asher
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; December 13th, 2009 at 01:42 PM.
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  #90  
Old April 24th, 2008, 03:31 PM
Arya Wiese Arya Wiese is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post

This Style, Arya, not only will be treasured by your family, but also tells of the richness of close family ties. Most "snap shots" in family shoe boxes or albums have memories. Yours are funny too and mean a lot to the rest of us, grandparents especially!

Asher
I does mean alot to us for sure and my mom really loves the images I have captured of the family over the years. I actually prefer to capture the real moments then have stuff staged. It's what I think I am better at but the posed sessions I have pay the bills, :) .
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