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  #1  
Old February 20th, 2016, 08:49 AM
Jim Dockery Jim Dockery is offline
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Default Sunrise Panoramas from Mt. Summit

I got these last fall from the top of Mt. Pugh in Washington's North Cascades. I've climbed almost every mountain in these pictures, some many times, so this is my backyard.




Sperry-Big Four




Mt. Baker behind Whitechuck Peak



My favorite of the trip (yes, I got rained on soon after this was shot):

Mt. Baker & Shuksan behind Whitechuck
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  #2  
Old February 20th, 2016, 11:00 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Jim,

All stunning.

This is my favorite:


Mt. Baker behind Whitechuck Peak

Best regards,

Doug
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  #3  
Old December 29th, 2016, 12:07 PM
Pat Dwyer Pat Dwyer is offline
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Why black and white.......? PD
....
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  #4  
Old December 29th, 2016, 12:58 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Obviously work well in panoramic lay out. Did you like the original color images as well?
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  #5  
Old December 29th, 2016, 03:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Dwyer View Post
Why black and white.......? PD
....
Pat,

Let me add my feelings on this. The very best photography of the masters, as the art developed has been in B&W. Only this allows 100% devotion to texture, shading, gross and fine structure and form. As soon as color is introduced, the emotional eruptions consequent on use of color can distract from the purity of form.

If, by chance one is interested in fall colors, then that is an entirely different circumstance, where, of course, the blessings of color splashes and variations are the whole draw of the picture. Absent that, if the form has impact, it will be best shown in monochrome. Of course one can find exceptions, but with the tools available in wet chemistry and digital imaging, nothing can match the B&W landscape where texture shadow, layering, light and form are key to the design and strength of the presentation.

Chances are it will also look wonderful in color, especially if there are animals, birds and people in it as well. But, the most pure form, reflecting the work of the masters, will always be in B&W!

For those brought up with digital imaging, color is so expected and "normal", so B&W might seem a twist of some "truth". Actually, the truth of photography is limited to such facts as the make of the camera, the reported settings and notation of who clicked the shutter.

To appreciate classical B&W photography one does have to invest a modest effort in perusing the works of those who trailblazed this form of artwork. Otherwise, color might be the only comfortable option.

Asher
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  #6  
Old January 1st, 2017, 05:57 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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This is a stunning set! Love those views!
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  #7  
Old January 1st, 2017, 06:31 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Let me add my feelings on this. The very best photography of the masters, as the art developed has been in B&W. Only this allows 100% devotion to texture, shading, gross and fine structure and form. As soon as color is introduced, the emotional eruptions consequent on use of color can distract from the purity of form.

If, by chance one is interested in fall colors, then that is an entirely different circumstance, where, of course, the blessings of color splashes and variations are the whole draw of the picture. Absent that, if the form has impact, it will be best shown in monochrome. Of course one can find exceptions, but with the tools available in wet chemistry and digital imaging, nothing can match the B&W landscape where texture shadow, layering, light and form are key to the design and strength of the presentation.

Chances are it will also look wonderful in color, especially if there are animals, birds and people in it as well. But, the most pure form, reflecting the work of the masters, will always be in B&W!

For those brought up with digital imaging, color is so expected and "normal", so B&W might seem a twist of some "truth". Actually, the truth of photography is limited to such facts as the make of the camera, the reported settings and notation of who clicked the shutter.

To appreciate classical B&W photography one does have to invest a modest effort in perusing the works of those who trailblazed this form of artwork. Otherwise, color might be the only comfortable option.
A very interesting outlook on the role of B&W photography. Thanks.

Happy New Year!

Best regards,

Doug
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  #8  
Old February 6th, 2017, 10:56 AM
Michael Ritter Michael Ritter is offline
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They would all make very nice wall hangings. Well done as they are spectacular!
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  #9  
Old February 10th, 2017, 06:09 PM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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I think this set of black and white images are incredible! Fabulous work!
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  #10  
Old February 10th, 2017, 06:19 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Maggie,

Thanks for addressing this wonderful set. It does serve to celebrate both the beauty of our planet and the amazing rendering of this by modern digital photography in B&W.

Your attention and support to our good work here is so appreciated!

Asher
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; March 11th, 2017 at 03:24 PM.
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  #11  
Old February 14th, 2017, 03:42 PM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Amazing work Jim!!
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  #12  
Old March 11th, 2017, 03:34 PM
Jim Dockery Jim Dockery is offline
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Thanks for all the nice comments.

Pat, Asher nailed it on why go B&W. Peter, yes, I also liked the original color versions, but these esp. stood out in B&W.

Here are a few color shots from sunset/rise (I spent the night on the summit by myself):



Sunset over Puget Sound from Mt. Pugh



Moon Over Glacier Peak



Sunrise on Mt. Baker
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  #13  
Old March 11th, 2017, 09:28 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Moon Over Glacier Peak




This I wanted to enjoy on its own. That night sky is simply magnificent!


Asher
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  #14  
Old March 14th, 2017, 02:00 AM
Andy brown Andy brown is offline
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Jim, it was a great series already, now with the addition of the superb colour shots (to go with the superb B&W's), it's awesome.

I love the way you reach into the scenes to isolate the powerful points and concentrate the colour.
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  #15  
Old March 15th, 2017, 12:57 PM
Jim Dockery Jim Dockery is offline
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Thanks for the last comments. This night epitomizes why I hike/climb/photograph. It was also one of the first nights out with my new Sony A7rII and I was quite satisfied with the results.
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  #16  
Old March 15th, 2017, 02:06 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Dockery View Post
Thanks for the last comments. This night epitomizes why I hike/climb/photograph. It was also one of the first nights out with my new Sony A7rII and I was quite satisfied with the results.
I would love to hear how far you can enlarge your detail rich prints from this wonderful Sony A7IIR. In my experience, apart from defining individual hair strands better, looking from 6" away, the Phase One MF back was no better for impact than the A7R original version, at least in my hands. So I expect that this newer camera of yours is even better.

Asher
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