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Old September 13th, 2018, 01:22 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Default Carla's adventure in the Black Hills

Carla is a member (in fact is the founding and current queen) of the New Mexico Roadrunner Chapter of The Red Hat Society, which as you may know is a social order for "mature" women. It is headquartered here in Alamogordo, N.M.

But she also belongs to a chapter known as Miss Kitty's Social club, which is a floating chapter, without a fixed geographic base. It has members from all over the U.S. (and a few from outside), and has one adventure each year, in locations all across the U.S. (mostly so far in the western states).

This year's adventure was in the Black Hills region of western South Dakota. It was only a long weekend in length, but included many wondrous events, including:

a. A visit to the Mount Rushmore National Memorial, where the girls got to see the stirring lowering of the U.S. flag at dusk.

b. A visit to the site of the Crazy Horse Memorial, where a colossal statue depicting the famed Oglala Lakota warrior, Crazy Horse, perhaps best known for his victory in the infamous Battle of the Little Bighorn, is under construction.

c. A ride on an antique steam train, drawn by a unique locomotive.

d. The girls donning period costumes (two different kinds) and stunning the civilian patrons of a restaurant and a saloon.

I'll cover (a), (b), and (c) in some detail in later messages in this thread. But I'll open with a shot of Carla at the entryway to the Mount Rushmore National Memorial:



Kimberly Gugliotta: Carla at the Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 80, f/2.8, 1/60 s

Here we see Carla and two of her friends in one of their sets of period costumes:



Carla and two of her friends, Kathy and Myrna (from Maui, Hawai'i) in their period costumes

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 100, f/2.0, 1/20 s

[to be continued]
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Old September 13th, 2018, 02:06 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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[Part 2]

Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a sculpture of the heads of four U.S. presidents, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln, carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, U.S.A. The faces of the subjects are approximately 60 feet high.

It was originally planned that the four subjects be depicted from head to shoulders, and the layout of the sculpture was based on that, but a lack of funds (and the outbreak of World War II) precluded completing the shoulder portions. We do see the "rough in" for Washington accommodating that.

The sculpture was designed and most of the work was overseen by famed sculptor Gutzon Borglum, assisted by his son Lincoln Borglum. The senior Borglum always was fascinated by Abraham Lincoln, and named his son after him. After Borglum's death in early 1941, his son supervised the remaining work.

The work began in 1927. In October of 1941, the work was suspended due to a lack of funds; the outbreak shortly after of World War II then precluded the resumption of work.

Here we see the memorial at late afternoon:



Carla C. Kerr: The Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 125, f/2.8/ 1/100 s

We note that the left side of Lincoln's face is unfinished. There are several parts to the story of why that is so. Lincoln's face was not symmetrical, and its left side was mildly "deformed". Borglum, who had done several sculptures of Lincoln before this project, was alert to this, and always wanted to have any sculpture present the right side of the face, but that did not always work out.

In Borglum's 1908 bust of Lincoln (now on display in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol Building), which might be observed from any direction, Borglum made the left side of the face a bit "vague" and in fact subtly did not portray the left ear at all.

Various design considerations dictated that in the Mount Rushmore sculpture it would be the left side of Lincoln's face that would be outward (which no doubt irritated Borglum). In Borglum's original small-scale model of the sculpture, the left side of Lincoln's face was represented "realistically". But, oddly enough, when work on the sculpture ceased in 1941, the left side of Lincoln's face was unfinished.

Many ponder whether this was just the way the timing worked out, or whether it was perhaps Lincoln Borglum's way of giving his father the last laugh. In any case, after World War II ended, there was no serious discussion of doing any further work on the sculpture. Indeed, sometimes less is more.

But back to Carla's adventure. Here is a shot taken during the retiring of the American flag at dusk at the Memorial:



Carla C. Kerr: Retiring the American flag

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 800, f/2.8 1/40 s

We see a Park Service ranger giving instructions on folding the flag to a number of veterans who participated in the ceremony, none of whom had ever folded the flag in such a context before.

[to be continued]

Last edited by Doug Kerr; September 13th, 2018 at 05:17 PM.
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  #3  
Old September 13th, 2018, 03:22 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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[Part 3]

The Black Hills Central Railroad (BHCR) is a standard gauge, steam-powered (mostly) "heritage railroad" that operates over a ten-mile route between Hill City and Keystone, North Dakota, U.S.A. Its route is part of the former Keystone branch of the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, originally built to support gold mining operations in the South Dakota Black Hills.

Carla and several of her fellow Red Hatters rode the line round trip. Their train was pulled by the line's flagship locomotive, BHCR no. 110, a 2-6-6-2T tank Mallet locomotive, originally built in 1928 for Weyerhauser Timber Company. We see it here just as it has pulled into the station at Keystone to load passengers:



Carla C. Kerr: BHCR no. 110 pulls into the station

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 80, f/2.8. 1/400 s

Sadly, the circumstances were such that Carla couldn't get a good clear shot of the locomotive from the side, so I will resort to pictures snagged elsewhere for illustration later in this essay.

The Mallet type of locomotive is names after its designer, Swiss engineer Anatole Mallet. He was a French-speaking Swiss, and accordingly it is the custom to say the name of the locomotive type with the French pronunciation, approximately "mal-LAY".

The Mallet locomotive has two unique features:

• It is an articulated locomotive. It actually comprises two "sub-locomotives", each with its own stem engine driving six driver wheels, both under a common frame and fed by a common boiler. The frontmost of these sub-locomotives is able to pivot under the frame, thus giving the beast the ability to negotiate curves of relatively small radius (often encountered in the tricky right-of-way found in mining operations).

• It is a compound locomotive. That means that the steam from the boiler, initially at full boiler pressure, first works in one or more cylinders of relatively-smaller diameter. Then, exhausting from these "high pressure" (HP) cylinders, now at a lower pressure, it then works in one or more cylinders of relatively-larger diameter (the "low pressure"–LP–cylinders). For reasons that are beyond the scope of this note, this gives a greater efficiency to the overall system.

In the Mallet implementation of this concept, the HP cylinders are on the rearmost sub-locomotive, and the LP cylinders on the frontmost.

We get a bit better looks at some of the arrangements in this photo of that same locomotive (found someplace on the Internet):



BHCR no. 110

Notwithstanding the perspective, we can see that the cylinder on the frontmost sub-locomotive has a substantially larger diameter than that on the rearmost.

Then rusty-looking pipe carries the steam exhausted from valve of the the rear cylinder to valve of the front cylinder. It has swivel joints in it to accommodate the movement of the frontmost sub-locomotive. This pipe is of substantially larger diameter than would be needed just for the conveyance of the steam. In that way, it large volume provides a reservoir to deal with the fact that the "puffs out" of the steam from the HP cylinder are not (necessarily) synchronized with the "puffs in" of the steam into the LP cylinder.

The "T" in the type designation means that this is a tank locomotive (yes, just like Thomas). That means that it carries its own supply of water (in this case in curved tanks around the boiler, blue in the picture just above), rather than depending on a separate tender for that. As for the coal (also carried in the tender for conventional locomotives), that is carried in a small "bunker" at the back of the locomotive, rather like a car's trunk. We see it in this shot of that same locomotive from the Internet:



BHCR no. 110 showing coal bunker

It might seem that there is a big disparity between the size of the coal bunker and the size of the water tanks, but in fact typically a steam locomotive of this type consumes (by volume) about five times as much water as coal.

But enough of locomotive machinery, and back to cute girls. Here we see a batch of 'em in car 112, "Oreville":



Carla C. Kerr: Red Hatters aboard

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 200, f/1.8. 1/30 s

This car was originally built in 1913.

[to be continued]

Last edited by Doug Kerr; September 13th, 2018 at 06:57 PM.
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  #4  
Old September 13th, 2018, 04:41 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Fascinating post Doug and I love their red hat displays (albeit lacking the signage of other red hats in the news). That second photo should be the cover on a magazine. As they seem to go to similar places I wonder if they ever cross paths with the Rainbow People.
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Old September 13th, 2018, 04:49 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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[Part 4]

Crazy Horse (born c 1840, named at birth "Among the Trees" ) was a fabled Oglala Lakota warrior, perhaps best remembered for his key role in the defeat of a U.S. Army force under Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer at Little Bighorn river, Montana Territory, in 1876. He died in September, 1877, while in U.S. Army custody after having surrendered with his people after their band had been weakened almost to the death in a long struggle with the U.S. Army in punishing winter conditions.

In 1939, Henry Standing Bear, an Oglala Lakota chief, and well-known statesman and elder in the American Indian community, recruited and commissioned Polish-American sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski to build the Crazy Horse Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The sculpture will depict Crazy Horse atop a charging horse, and is being carved out of the granite of Thunderhead Mountain, about 17 miles from Mount Rushmore, South Dakota.

The work began in 1948. There is no estimate of when the work will be completed. The project is conducted by a memorial foundation. No federal or state funding is involved. There have been a number of very generous philanthropic donations over the course of the project to date, but the projected total cost is certainly stupendous.

Crazy Horse's head will be 87 feet high; his eyes are each 17 feet wide. The sculpture's final dimensions are planned to be 641 feet wide and 563 feet (172 m) high. By some reckonings, it is said that when completed it will be the world's largest sculpture. By comparison, the Great Sphinx at Giza is about 240 feet long and 66 feet high. (No, I do not want to defend the comparison nor debate its terms.)

Here we see a small-scale model of the sculpture:



Carla C. Kerr: Model of the Crazy Horse Memorial Sculpture

Here we see the sculpture as it now exists:



Carla C. Kerr: The Crazy Horse Memorial Sculpture

We can see a painted outline showing generally where the horse's head will be.

The face was completed and dedicated in 1998.

At the upper right, workers are carving the finger on Crazy Horse's outstretched hand, considered to be one of the most critical parts of the work.

Carla says one cannot imagine how thrilling it is to see this work "in person".

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 13th, 2018, 04:52 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Peter,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
Fascinating post Doug and I love their red hat displays (albeit lacking the signage of other red hats in the news). That second photo should be the cover on a magazine. As they seem to go to similar places I wonder if they ever cross paths with the Rainbow People.
Maybe so.

Probably quite a contrast in "costume".

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:04 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Carl’s hat wins hands down!

The queens would follow her fashion at Ascot if she saw her!

Asher
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:06 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Carl’s hat wins hands down!

The queens would follow her fashion at Ascot if she saw her!





Carla C. Kerr: BHCR no. 110 pulls into the station

Canon PowerShot G16, ISO 80, f/2.8. 1/400 s


And the “110”, that’s for me something sentimental and fabulous!

Asher
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:07 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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....and the G10 Canon Camera. Really what more do we generally need, except to fill up massive hard drives in a blink of the eye!

Asher
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:21 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
....and the G10 Canon Camera. Really what more do we generally need, except to fill up massive hard drives in a blink of the eye!
Indeed. And the G16 has a wonderful lens.

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:39 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Peter,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
Fascinating post Doug and I love their red hat displays (albeit lacking the signage of other red hats in the news).
I actually have two red baseball caps, both with messages. One says, "I love my Red Hatter" and the other says "America is already great". But I never wear baseball caps.

Still, it's a little less great than when Carla got me the latter cap (late in 2016).

Carla always wears a hat when she goes out, not necessarily a red one (if she's not on a Red Hat event). She always gets so many nice comments.

But lately she has often been wearing the red one seen in the first shot of this thread, and it seems to be a special "hit".

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 13th, 2018, 05:52 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Hi, Asher,


Indeed. And the G16 has a wonderful lens.

Best regards,

Doug
I am still at G4 LOL!

Asher
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Old September 16th, 2018, 03:57 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Further pictures of the Red Hat adventure in South Dakota, most shot with people's telephones, stream in from various organs of the Internet.

This one of Carla needed a little editing (she was disappointed to have sported a napkin when the shot was taken), but I really like it; we're not sure just now who took it:



Photographer unknown (Ed: Douglas A. Kerr): Carla at Dinner

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 16th, 2018, 04:13 PM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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What a lovely lady the President ! :)
And what a nice set of images, Doug !... :)
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Old September 16th, 2018, 05:12 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Antonio,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio Correia View Post
What a lovely lady the President ! :)
She is indeed, in ever so many ways.

Quote:
And what a nice set of images, Doug !... :)
Thank you so much.

Best regards,

Doug
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Old September 16th, 2018, 06:21 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Corrigendum

In an earlier post in this thread, I discussed the locomotive that pulled the train Carla rode, using this figure:



BHCR no. 110

I then said [some errors are corrected here]:
The rusty-looking pipe carries the steam exhausted from valve of the rear cylinder to the valve of the front cylinder. It has swivel joints in it to accommodate the movement of the frontmost sub-locomotive.
In fact, the "rusty-looking" pipe carries the steam from the boiler to the valve of the rear cylinder.

The piping that leads the exhaust steam from the valves of the rear cylinders to the valves of the font cylinders (which must be articulated to accommodate the swiveling of the frontmost sub-locomotive) are behind the driving wheels and can't be seen in this figure.

************

But, while I am speaking of this locomotive-

The number this locomotive carries in the BHCR fleet, 110, is in fact the number it had when it was originally made for Weyerhauser Timber (1928). But somehow another essentially identical locomotive made for Weyerhauser (1938) was also numbered 110. So this was one called No. 110 No. 1, and the other one No. 110 No. 2. (No, I could not make this up!)

After both of those locomotives had been sold to Rayonier (also a paper and pulp company), No. 110 No. 2 was renumbered to No. 111 to avoid confusion (so you think?). No.111 was substantially revised during its later life, notably:

• Converting it from compound operation to "simple" operation (compound operation seemed like a good idea, but there were many complications to it that really spoiled its advantages).

• Removing the water tanks and small coal bunker and setting it up to operate from a conventional tender.

Later in its life, our No. 110 was also given a tender and set up so it could operated from it when required, but (thankfully) the water tanks and coal bunker were not removed.

Best regards,

Doug
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