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  #1  
Old January 8th, 2015, 04:45 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Thumbs up 24th International Photographic Exhibition Los Angeles January 15-18 2015





It's at the Reef in the LA Mart this year!




[CENTER]



"The annual international photographic art exposition photo la will take place January 15-18, 2015, at The Reef/LA Mart in downtown Los Angeles. Our 24th edition will expand our collection of international galleries and dealers, showcasing the world's best photo-based art. Additionally, we will introduce a variety of new lectures, round table discussions, and panels as part of our renowned programming, which continues to grow each year.

For the 2015 edition, we are pleased to announce that we will honor photo
grapher Catherine Opie at our Opening Night Benefit Gala and present an installation of her work.






Catherine Opie: Untitled

Courtesy of Regan Project

Comment: If you have been following Opie's work, you will be impressed by her grasp of the medium, and versatility with exacting and brilliantly lit formal portraits that are from an era of portrait paintings by the great Dutch and Flemish master to abstractions that have a light and gentle touch and transparency of folds of pink and blue gossamer silk fabric held up to the sky. A.K.

Opie has become one of America’s premiere documentarians, photographing the American landscape — from the Alaskan glaciers to its suburban freeways — as frequently as she images its citizens. Opie’s work has been exhibited extensively throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. We look forward to celebrating her lifelong contributions to the photographic arts. "

"After 17 years as a gallerist and many art fairs come and gone, photo la 2014 was very strong and well organized with a highly efficient staff. There were great crowds and an even flow of traffic from beginning to end. The attendees were a good mix of people from collectors to museum curators and of course photo aficionados and enthusiasts. Sales were good and steady all four days!"
- Patricia Correia, Patricia Correia Projects, Los Angeles



ATTEND PHOTO LA 2015

DATES

Public Hours:
Friday: January 16, 11am - 7pm
Saturday: January 17, 11am - 7pm
Sunday: January 18, 11am - 6pm

Opening Night Benefit Gala:
Thursday, January 15, from 7pm - 10pm

PURCHASE TICKETS here
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  #2  
Old January 8th, 2015, 07:59 PM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
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Asher, if I'd taken that photo, I'd trash it as a out-of-focus mistake. Please explain why it's worthy of exhibiting. I'm not trying to be obtuse but really want to understand.

Cheers, Mike.
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  #3  
Old January 8th, 2015, 08:30 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Catherine Opie: Untitled

Courtesy of Regan Project




Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Stones View Post
Asher, if I'd taken that photo, I'd trash it as a out-of-focus mistake. Please explain why it's worthy of exhibiting. I'm not trying to be obtuse but really want to understand.

Cheers, Mike.


Catherine is known for a large body of work photographing in a grand classical style with rich colors, each totally real and with presence of the person shown. So, when one sees this work, we already know how she could have made the picture. She has departed from that, just as Matisse did, leaving real objects and going for paper cutouts. I can only surmise that this could, perhaps be a similar challenge for her. It's a new challenge, I guess to convey the sense of a waterfall but giving only sufficient information to evoke such a concept.

If we know her work, then it's as if we have to remember, like in a mine the unspoken words. I'd love to learn from her about her intent.

........... and yes, if most others would have that picture, it would, likely as not be discarded as being of no value! The difference being that this was achieved, presumably, by design and is not a failure to achieve a classical image.

Asher
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  #4  
Old January 9th, 2015, 02:42 AM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
[CENTER]
Catherine is known for a large body of work photographing in a grand classical style with rich colors, each totally real and with presence of the person shown. So, when one sees this work, we already know how she could have made the picture. She has departed from that, just as Matisse did, leaving real objects and going for paper cutouts. I can only surmise that this could, perhaps be a similar challenge for her. It's a new challenge, I guess to convey the sense of a waterfall but giving only sufficient information to evoke such a concept.

If we know her work, then it's as if we have to remember, like in a mine the unspoken words. I'd love to learn from her about her intent.

........... and yes, if most others would have that picture, it would, likely as not be discarded as being of no value! The difference being that this was achieved, presumably, by design and is not a failure to achieve a classical image.

Asher
A statement about a famous photographer's undisclosed "intent" is not enough for me. Here are some reasons why.

As undergraduates, our professors drilled into us that a scientist's reputation should not sway our evaluation of the merits/demerits of a study he/she published. Similarly, when a competitive athlete I knew that I was only as good as my next race regardless of past performances. So I try to evaluate any product or outcome in and of itself. Because this orientation causes me few problems when evaluating most works of art, I didn't look at Catherine's portfolio before commenting on the picture.

The untitled photo in question is recognizable as a waterfall reduced to elements of falling water and spray in a rocky surround. The blurring that reduced its components to basic elements might have occurred when shooting or in post-processing, but that doesn't matter. The product remains a blurred image of a waterfall. Why is that worthy of a place on the wall of an exhibition? What does that imply about photography as a form of art? If the intent is to convey a message about photography, does it succeed? I don't have answers only questions. Am I being dense or what?

Cheers, Mike.
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  #5  
Old January 9th, 2015, 08:06 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Stones View Post
A statement about a famous photographer's undisclosed "intent" is not enough for me. Here are some reasons why.

As undergraduates, our professors drilled into us that a scientist's reputation should not sway our evaluation of the merits/demerits of a study he/she published. Similarly, when a competitive athlete I knew that I was only as good as my next race regardless of past performances. So I try to evaluate any product or outcome in and of itself. Because this orientation causes me few problems when evaluating most works of art, I didn't look at Catherine's portfolio before commenting on the picture.

The untitled photo in question is recognizable as a waterfall reduced to elements of falling water and spray in a rocky surround. The blurring that reduced its components to basic elements might have occurred when shooting or in post-processing, but that doesn't matter. The product remains a blurred image of a waterfall. Why is that worthy of a place on the wall of an exhibition? What does that imply about photography as a form of art? If the intent is to convey a message about photography, does it succeed? I don't have answers only questions. Am I being dense or what?




Catherine Opie: Untitled

Courtesy of Regan Project



Mike,

In such a delicately colored image, it could be that the sRGB file simply does not carry the billions of hues that make up the original photograph. I can see theres an array of soft pinks in the waterfall with a movement to blues in both sides of the water and then blues and pinks streaking across the sky. It could be that standing in front of the actual photograph, the range of colors would make the experience captivating and worthy of lingering to be mesmerized. But we are faced with just this small representation, and I caution myself to remember that some images cannot be adequately shown by the limited gamut of a compressed jpg, especially when there is an almost complete lack of contrasting elements and formed edges and boundaries. So this is merely a peep at the photograph, not the actual test of it's value to me.

So is this glimpse of the waterfall landscape a fine photograph with its lack of detail, simple composition and blurriness qualities worth admiration? Or, is it, perhaps, just something someone also made on a rainy day, an utterly failed attempt at abstract art? One feels challenged that if one does not appreciate it, one is missing some nuanced beauty and if one does one is foolishly following the rest of the flock.

We all know that focus, good lighting, technical prowess, brilliant composition and following "rules" are not requirements we would demand of our own art. Yet, we remain hesitant and highly suspicious of photographs that do not meet standards we have gotten used to! That's what's happening here. But we do put up with such works at exhibitions. We trust that the curators understand something here that we do not have the background for. We give them all benefit of the doubt and pray we are not being "taken" again!

At major retrospectives, curators will even include many pictures, mere "snaps" taken at the beach or in a supermarket window or at a family barbecue, that for sure where never intended as anything but personal mementos. Artists normally carefully hone their skills at presenting a coherent body of well-0executed creative expression. A lot of ideas, of necessity, therefore, fall to the wayside if they are not obviously strong enough to carry their own weight and survive as art in a competitive environment. Likely as not, we're deprived of a lot of new ideas ,at the edges of expectations, that are self-censored by the photographer's need for maintaining appearances.

The established artist, however, gets the freedom eventually to step out of a strict mode of assassinating one's offspring, (and actually shows of work they know that the unknown photographer could not be forgiven for). The work now only has to be a satisfactory export of creative ideas that satisfies the artist sense of worth, as it will be grabbed feverishly by avid supporters. It could be that some of us are are not sufficiently attuned to the coding and esthetics in the new work. After all, many photographs, do indeed, require some understanding to the homages and references to previous art that the circle of aficionado really understands and appreciates.

My role, when I meet such work, especially knowing the command and talent of the photographer, is to ask myself what of it do I understand and hold my judgement until I learn more. I'm hesitant to assume that because this picture seems to be what someone else would discard, that this photograph has lesser value than the obviously accomplished works of Opie that anyone can easily admire. Of course, always there is the nagging concern that the photographer could have become delusional.

But for now, I'm the one who is learning from the totality of her exceptional body of work.

Asher
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  #6  
Old January 9th, 2015, 09:23 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Well now, let's look at something different. Here we have a picture of the edge of a wonderful garden overlooking the water.




Paul Turounet: Gardens of Paradise,

Courtesy of JDC Fine Art


So tell me what you experience, feel and think about this photograph.

Asher
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  #7  
Old January 9th, 2015, 09:45 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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By contrast, this picture is easy to like!

It's immediately within reach of all. A handsome man is depicted in 3 apparently fragmented poses. It seems to be made up of adjacent and overlapping instant film positives. We recognize Johnny Depp!





Maurizio Galimberti: Johnny Depp

Courtesy of Cristinerose Gallery


Galimberti makes mosaics with multiple Polaroid pictures of his subjects, often movie and TV stars and celebrities. So the picture gets a boost from the fame of the subject. but his craft is excellent and the result is engaging and has life.



Screenshot of Google Search for Galimberi Images


It's not intuitive that this old-fashioned way of making large detailed images would work so well, but it is surprisingly effective. The staccato repeats of parts the body is like watching a movie with each new frame being welcomed at a low steady pace. There's much more life here than in one straightforward portrait.

Asher
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  #8  
Old January 10th, 2015, 07:18 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Well now, let's look at something different. Here we have a picture of the edge of a wonderful garden overlooking the water.




Paul Turounet: Gardens of Paradise,

Courtesy of JDC Fine Art


So tell me what you experience, feel and think about this photograph.

Asher
Hello Asher

I think this image is the strongest out of the three presented, for its subject content and its originality.

James
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  #9  
Old January 10th, 2015, 08:55 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
Hello Asher

I think this image is the strongest out of the three presented, for its subject content and its originality.

James


Jim,

Your instinct and intellect are well tuned and resonate with my own taste! This is indeed a remarkable picture for both beauty and clarity. The wry observation of our way of life, luxury and litter and lack of respect, is a biting part of this artists work. He's a keen observer and socially responsible. He appreciates innocence too.



Screenshot: The Current Works of Paul Turounet at jdcfineart.com


Look at the website and view his marvelous images here. I assure you, you will be have a rewarding experience.

Asher
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  #10  
Old January 10th, 2015, 09:45 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Jim,

Your instinct and intellect are well tuned and resonate with my own taste! This is indeed a remarkable picture for both beauty and clarity. The wry observation of our way of life, luxury and litter and lack of respect, is a biting part of this artists work. He's a keen observer and socially responsible. He appreciates innocence too.



Screenshot: The Current Works of Paul Turounet at jdcfineart.com


Look at the website and view his marvelous images here. I assure you, you will be have a rewarding experience.

Asher
Hello Asher

The website also shows prices below some of the images. Is this pricing scheme correct? The reason I ask is that the pricing appears to be on the bottom of the wine list.

James
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  #11  
Old January 10th, 2015, 10:44 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
Hello Asher

The website also shows prices below some of the images. Is this pricing scheme correct? The reason I ask is that the pricing appears to be on the bottom of the wine list.

James

Jim,

I have tried to select photographs that are within reach and are worthy of saving for posterity. By luck, we can sometimes fulfill both conditions. The galleries here in LA go for more expensive offerings. Some start at $5,000 some at $12,000 and in San Francisco, $25,000 -$65,000 is asked without batting an eyelid! But generally these are works of about 50 to 60 inches high.

See the size of the pictures I have selected, they tend to be smaller.

Asher
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  #12  
Old January 10th, 2015, 10:56 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Here's a fellow from Australia who has a passion for the subject of belonging, exodus and being part of the landscape.Learn about "The Foreigner" here.

He has championed the aboriginal Australians children who were adopted to foreign families abroad without their own families consent. This diaspora is unheard of by most of us and is shocking.

He also looks at the human, (as a form modeled of his own body with the palette knife and paint) on toe a monochrome ink landscape. One again, his works, at about $2,200 for albeit small prints, are within reach of many of us. Also the esthetics of the photograph are approachable without much prior knowledge or training. There is no conceit here at all. His work, I believe, is a genuine expression of inner beliefs and passion. His pictures are well thought out and crafted like a performance. Well, it so turns out that he is also a successful playwright and has produced a number, some even on tour.


I particularly like this photograph in monochrome ink with a palette-knife colored figure to be in this years Photo LA:



©Henri von Noordenberg, Courtesy of Kunstkomplex
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  #13  
Old January 11th, 2015, 07:19 PM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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Asher, you are so lucky to be in L.A. to attend these interesting photo shows.

I read through the different discussions and have a few things I would add.

For Catherine Opie: I can see why Michael would ask why this is a good piece. When I look at it, I can easily realize that it is water falls and to me, the artist is letting me feel the mist and the freshness of the place that perhaps she felt when she was there. Now to be quite honest, I would not put this on my wall but then I wouldn't put a sharp image of this on my wall either, I don't believe.

For Paul Turonet: I went to see the images in his gallery and there were several that I liked more than this one. As for images of something beautiful juxtaposed with something like litter or trash - this is far from new and I think this particular photograph is not well enough taken for the trash to be a strong enough concept to make this a really good piece. That's just my own opinion - of course, I know nothing - it's just again not something I would ever want on my walls. I once took a picture in a beautiful small park of a porn magazine and a bottle of baby oil hidden under a tree. It was interesting but again, not something I would put on my walls.

Galimberti: His images are very easy on the eyes. I like the sense of balance and I'm sure it is more difficult to get right than most people would think. I like it a lot but then I like pretty things and this is pretty. I'm actually surprised it was allowed in the exhibition as so much today has to be either out of focus, taken crooked, over or underexposed, look like a snapshot and the odder the better. Maybe there is hope after all.

Henry Van Noordenburg - Foreigner:
Now this I think is awesome. Very interesting and unusual technique with the ink and carving on photo rag and the inclusion of his body etc., really is great to me. Original composition and very illustrative while actually making a strong statement. This I like, would put on my walls if I could actually afford it. You are lucky, you will get to see it and others he has made in person.

Anyways, not sure what my opinion counts, but there it is -- what I think of the few that have been displayed. Would I love to go.. sure - but not feasible. Please tell us all about it! :-)
Maggie
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  #14  
Old January 11th, 2015, 09:29 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggie Terlecki View Post
Asher, you are so lucky to be in L.A. to attend these interesting photo shows.

I read through the different discussions and have a few things I would add.

For Catherine Opie: I can see why Michael would ask why this is a good piece. When I look at it, I can easily realize that it is water falls and to me, the artist is letting me feel the mist and the freshness of the place that perhaps she felt when she was there. Now to be quite honest, I would not put this on my wall but then I wouldn't put a sharp image of this on my wall either, I don't believe.

For Paul Turonet: I went to see the images in his gallery and there were several that I liked more than this one. As for images of something beautiful juxtaposed with something like litter or trash - this is far from new and I think this particular photograph is not well enough taken for the trash to be a strong enough concept to make this a really good piece. That's just my own opinion - of course, I know nothing - it's just again not something I would ever want on my walls. I once took a picture in a beautiful small park of a porn magazine and a bottle of baby oil hidden under a tree. It was interesting but again, not something I would put on my walls.

Galimberti: His images are very easy on the eyes. I like the sense of balance and I'm sure it is more difficult to get right than most people would think. I like it a lot but then I like pretty things and this is pretty. I'm actually surprised it was allowed in the exhibition as so much today has to be either out of focus, taken crooked, over or underexposed, look like a snapshot and the odder the better. Maybe there is hope after all.

Henry Van Noordenburg - Foreigner:
Now this I think is awesome. Very interesting and unusual technique with the ink and carving on photo rag and the inclusion of his body etc., really is great to me. Original composition and very illustrative while actually making a strong statement. This I like, would put on my walls if I could actually afford it. You are lucky, you will get to see it and others he has made in person.

Anyways, not sure what my opinion counts, but there it is -- what I think of the few that have been displayed. Would I love to go.. sure - but not feasible. Please tell us all about it! :-)
Maggie
Maggie,

Yes, we're privileged to be able to experience these works up close and in some cases, it could make all the difference in gleaning full appreciation.

I appreciate your willingness to be honest and stake out positions and not just be politically correct and nice to everyone. We gain a lot from openness and in fact that's the key essential to art, (and society itself), progressing. I will try to digest all your opinions and you are helping me understand these diverse works. I will also find more work to highlight, so keep your eyes on this thread.

Thanks for your generosity in stopping by and reading everything!

Asher
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