Open Photography Forums  
HOME FORUMS NEWS FAQ SEARCH

Go Back   Open Photography Forums > Photography Discussions > Photography as Art

Photography as Art Original boundary-testing images. Open to comments without moderation. For works intended for clients and galleries submit to GALLERY ONE.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old November 22nd, 2010, 10:11 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default Untitled 3




Untitled 3 – M Hampton






Untitled 3 – M Hampton

Last edited by Mark Hampton; November 22nd, 2010 at 12:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old November 23rd, 2010, 06:18 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brighton (UK)
Posts: 991
Default

hi,
We hesitate between photos of galaxies, or the microscopic size of a piece of asbestos, these threads and dust are sublimed by highlights and the deep black is a little bit intimidating. I like them. The 2nd one works better for me, because of the distribution of the HL in the frame.
__________________
Sandrine: the genuine "5th wheel of the wagon". Second to none! Established 1970.
website
C&C always welcome!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old November 23rd, 2010, 12:29 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

Sandrine,

thanks for the thoughts and feedback,its much appreciated.

cheers
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old November 23rd, 2010, 10:25 PM
Maris Rusis Maris Rusis is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
Posts: 312
Default

I fear the subject matter has not repaid the effort, art, and resources lavished upon it. Minimalism, and I think this is an example, is a high stakes game where less sometimes doesn't amount to more. But that's no reason to quit; just a spur to go at it again.
__________________
"Photography or the application of the chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation...". Photography, the word, coined and first uttered by Sir John Herschel at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London; 14 March, 1839.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old November 24th, 2010, 12:31 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 26,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maris Rusis View Post
I fear the subject matter has not repaid the effort, art, and resources lavished upon it. Minimalism, and I think this is an example, is a high stakes game where less sometimes doesn't amount to more. But that's no reason to quit; just a spur to go at it again.
Maris,

It might be that this is a good example of iterative work being needed, perhaps and the image is not completed when seen in the viewfinder in the presence of so much more or what might be included but is not. Only when the latent image appears and one meets it like a "pen-pal" one has corresponded with for years and when one meets them for the first time, that relationship has to be retuned to the true beings that each person represents.

I think the image is within each of the current frames.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old November 24th, 2010, 06:30 PM
Maris Rusis Maris Rusis is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
Posts: 312
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Maris,

It might be that this is a good example of iterative work being needed, perhaps and the image is not completed when seen in the viewfinder in the presence of so much more or what might be included but is not. Only when the latent image appears and one meets it like a "pen-pal" one has corresponded with for years and when one meets them for the first time, that relationship has to be retuned to the true beings that each person represents.

I think the image is within each of the current frames.

Asher
An iterative approach can work powerfully even though individual pictures are largely devoid of content. But it is a hard row to hoe.

I've seen quite a few Art College “photographs” employing repetition of a motif. A banal image is a banal image but if it is repeated a dozen or so times it becomes a "significant" statement. All too often one ends up with an undertaking characterised by a stubborn exercise than an imaginative act; high minded laboriousness rather than a discharge of conceptual energy. The few iterative works that succeed for me tend to confirm that ideas about art never equal art.

The OP, Mark Hampton, has me intrigued. What will be the next iteration?
__________________
"Photography or the application of the chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation...". Photography, the word, coined and first uttered by Sir John Herschel at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London; 14 March, 1839.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old November 24th, 2010, 09:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 26,678
Default



Mark Hampton: Untitled

Edit from RAW file 20101115_0934 ADK

Mark,

I explored and this scene intrigued me. This reminded me of snow capped mountains aand also cave paintings.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old November 25th, 2010, 12:30 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 26,678
Default



Mark Hampton: Gallipoli

Edit from RAW file 20101115_0934 ADK

@ Mark,

I ventured again into your file and in the darkness found mayhem! I see men on a battlefield in the horror of war, the carnage of opposing infantry. Figures have arms outstretched as if hit by a bullet or others running forward in attack. There are fires, maybe for warming the soldiers at night, maybe from a shell.

This reminded me of the ill-fated Gallipoli Campaign, a monumental tragedy of World War I. The masses of British, New Zealand and Newfoundland troops were below the guns of the Turks and both sides suffered incomprehensible losses. I saw clumps of bullets from each side that smashed into each other each other in a distorted self-destruction, so thick were the volleys of bullets going each way.

Mustafa Kemal Pasha, later Atturturk and leader of Turkish state to inherit the shrunken area of the once powerful Ottomon Empire, commented on the sad loss of life and the heroism of the unsuccessful invaders.

Asher


@ Maris,

Inside everything in nature there are hidden secrets. That's why the greatest film photographers went back to re-explore negatives they had already printed perfectly. The film not only has what was intended but also families of inferences and shapes too. They represent a goldmine of artistic material, no less than when one walks along a mountain stream in spring.

Openness to new experience is the hallmark of the artist, scientist and detectives. We think of what is and what might be. Although for myself, much of work is defined in my brain beforehand and carefully drawn in pencil on a B&W background I print out, I also take advantage of what nature gives us that we don't expect and that is there.

Here, in Mark's photograph of a textured surface, there are many opportunities for creative work. It's just hard and does not come easily. But one must be at least open to such possibilities.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old November 25th, 2010, 01:44 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brighton (UK)
Posts: 991
Default

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG48Ftsr3OI
always makes me cry...

Quote:
Here, in Mark's photograph of a textured surface, there are many opportunities for creative work. It's just hard and does not come easily. But one must be at least open to such possibilities.
I agree. I think we must be careful of harsh comments with pieces of photography that we may not understand at first and just respect their inner beauty before trying to find any explanation. That's what I do because I'm not a "brain" person. My feelings always comes 1st. And the fact that it's in the "Photography as Art Work that could/should be considered by a fine art gallery." section doesn't change anything.
__________________
Sandrine: the genuine "5th wheel of the wagon". Second to none! Established 1970.
website
C&C always welcome!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old November 25th, 2010, 12:03 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

Asher,

thanks for taking the time to explore the blue images !

You have taken time out of your life to look into images that may or may not be intreasting and for that i am indebted.

I had a deffanate idea when I set about planning and making these images - it has not changed but the reditions that you have shown have opened up some further avenues of exploration. I will of course keep you posted.

cheers
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old November 25th, 2010, 12:08 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

Sandrine,

Thanks again for the thoughts - one persons beautiy is anothers poo !

cheers
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old November 25th, 2010, 12:22 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 26,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
You have taken time out of your life to look into images that may or may not be intreasting and for that i am indebted.
I'm fascinated by what's hidden in things we think we've chosen for some other reason.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
I had a deffanate idea when I set about planning and making these images - it has not changed but the reditions that you have shown have opened up some further avenues of exploration.
Let me share with you, you had me flummoxed, stymied and feeling under-educated with the unusual word, "deffanate". I really though the the prefix de would mean "without" I did find Fanate in Romania and vulgar references to Brittney Spears, bur no ffanate, LOL!

So now it's utterly obvious that you mean, definite or unambiguous!

So what was that idea? We, OTOH, have just the picture and without a title, the meanings are unlimited. I do prefer titles for that reason. For me, the second picture can only be the war in the Dardanelles. I'm stunned by the imagery hidden in your work! Giving no title hear gave me permission and license to freely look up my own libraries of knowledge, feelings and relevance. Thanks for that opportunity.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old November 26th, 2010, 09:26 AM
Ken Tanaka Ken Tanaka is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,302
Default

I like this line of thought, Mark. I do tend do be a bit of a mug for re-contextualizing patterns and surface characteristics. The fact that more than a few "men on the street" will have the reaction, "It makes me think of..." is a very good thing.

There's actually quite a large and vividly growing body of photographic art that follows such themes. I encourage you to continue to pursue such work and to learn more about others' works.

I also warn you not to be discouraged by those who will immediately reject such works. Audience and context are often extremely important for supporting such abstracted presentations, as is medium.

p.s. Titles, more often than not, greatly diminish such work. Unless you are genuinely and premeditatively trying to express a specific concept, skip 'em. Leave it untitled. Imagine, for example, if you chose to title the first image "Goats at the Pond". Now everyone is trying to see goats and feeling like jackasses when they can't.

The natural first human tendency for viewing anything is to answer the question, "What is it?". The joy of such work is to visually answer back, "What do you want it to be?".
__________________
- Ken Tanaka -
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old November 26th, 2010, 10:18 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 26,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Tanaka View Post
I also warn you not to be discouraged by those who will immediately reject such works. Audience and context are often extremely important for supporting such abstracted presentations, as is medium......

p.s. Titles, more often than not, greatly diminish such work. Unless you are genuinely and premeditatively trying to express a specific concept, skip 'em. Leave it untitled. Imagine, for example, if you chose to title the first image "Goats at the Pond". Now everyone is trying to see goats and feeling like jackasses when they can't.

The natural first human tendency for viewing anything is to answer the question, "What is it?". The joy of such work is to visually answer back, "What do you want it to be?".
Ken, this is so true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I'm fascinated by what's hidden in things we think we've chosen for some other reason.......

So what was that idea? We, OTOH, have just the picture and without a title, the meanings are unlimited. I do prefer titles for that reason.
That need for titles is limited to where the photographer wishes to direct the viewers' attention. However, in this kind of interpretive work, to omit the title is not only to trust the work but more so the imagination of the viewers:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
For me, the second picture, [which I processed from a fragment of the RAW file] , can only be the war in the Dardanelles. I'm stunned by the imagery hidden in your work! Giving no title here gave me permission and license to freely look up my own libraries of knowledge, feelings and relevance. Thanks for that opportunity.
My derivation of Mark's work merely represents the cultural baggage I bring to the picture. I don't expect others to populate it in the same way. Each of us has the opportunity build their own meanings.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old November 27th, 2010, 11:33 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

Ken / Asher,

thanks for the toughts and time... I will revert back when I have some further developments !

cheers
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old March 3rd, 2011, 05:31 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

Ken / Asher,

So the winter sun has moved on.... the light is from a different angle.... no better or worse just different... winter works were made and some are bearing fruit... Ashers take reminded me that this is as much about light as it is about the trace of life on a surface... I started to work on set of solutions which pulled the between the surface and the background...






- M Hampton




- M Hampton





- M Hampton




I am still working with the darker works but hey its almost spring here and its getting to sssi time again...

cheers
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old October 22nd, 2012, 02:36 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,332
Default

.


still working on this work - another winter is on its way - so time again for the window to revel what another year has done to it......

this work below is from another one of my photographic/time experiments...









the.original.language - Deka











i - Deka










ii - Deka









cheers






.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Challenge: Sense of richness of the "Commonly Overlooked!" Tom Robbins Themes 44 July 29th, 2014 12:45 PM
Challenge: The expressive face in the finest pictures you have. Asher Kelman Themes 100 January 26th, 2012 03:30 PM
Untitled charlotte thompson Riskit! 14 July 2nd, 2010 03:44 PM
Untitled fahim mohammed Photojournalism - Street - Documentary 4 March 15th, 2010 02:00 AM
Untitled Dawn William Blackford Close-up & Macro 4 August 23rd, 2009 07:48 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:28 PM.


Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet © of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion © 2006-2014 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!