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  #1  
Old April 29th, 2011, 03:20 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Default Why resolution is not everything

Last year, the evening light was wonderful when we made a walk at the lake.


Best regards,
Michael
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  #2  
Old April 29th, 2011, 06:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Last year, the evening light was wonderful when we made a walk at the lake.

You're so right, Michael, one our great mistakes is a consuming quest for detail to the detriment of what feelings can be generated by the shapes and color, alone. This picture exemplifies that great value of texture and simple shape buttoned down with a classic placement of a stopping point of interest. With just gold and black, the silhouetted bird could have morphed from the darkness between the gold, giving a sense of unity between it and the gold-reflected in the waters below.

Yes it's sentimental but boldly so! I like it. :)

Asher
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  #3  
Old April 30th, 2011, 01:00 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Thanks Asher, yes it is sentimental, but I like the simplicity. When you look at the elements making up this picture, it is just golden lines on a black canvas.

Not sentimental at all, but the message stays the same:






Best regards,
Michael

Last edited by Michael Nagel; April 30th, 2011 at 01:01 PM. Reason: Grammar
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  #4  
Old April 30th, 2011, 01:41 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Thanks Asher, yes it is sentimental, but I like the simplicity. When you look at the elements making up this picture, it is just golden lines on a black canvas.

Not sentimental at all, but the message stays the same:










Best regards,
Michael

Michael,

I added white space above and below as this deserves a light free setting as it's so gentle. What's fascinating to me, is that the lines of the trees curve inwards towards the summit and the sky. This gives the impression to me of "making an effort" as if they had some goal to reach.

Asher
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  #5  
Old May 1st, 2011, 03:21 AM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Thanks Asher - the additional space really helps.

I am thinking of continuing the series in a more general manner, so 'Landscape - Travel' would no longer be suited.

Best regards,
Michael
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  #6  
Old May 1st, 2011, 12:31 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Flowers do not always need abundance of detail:


Best regards,
Michael
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  #7  
Old May 1st, 2011, 12:41 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post

This is really good. The colors (little), the composition with the slow progression from darkness to light and, as Asher noted "the lines of the trees curve inwards towards the summit and the sky". Superbe.
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  #8  
Old May 1st, 2011, 02:50 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Thanks Jerome.
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  #9  
Old May 1st, 2011, 10:41 PM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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Beautiful images Michael. Indeed high resolution is not needed in these particular instances and
presentation.

Lovely.

Thank you.
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  #10  
Old May 2nd, 2011, 02:03 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Thanks Fahim. When I am on my 'Quest for Light', there are days when I see what I show in this thread.

Same lake, different place, half an hour later than the first one posted in this thread:


No need for more detail...

Best regards,
Michael
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  #11  
Old May 7th, 2011, 12:23 AM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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When the day way mainly gray, it is always a pleasure to see the clouds open up.


Best regards,
Michael
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  #12  
Old May 9th, 2011, 01:47 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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To end the series, here is one that has many possible crops. Still - I like the uncropped version.


Michael
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  #13  
Old March 11th, 2012, 02:32 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Adding a recent one:


Taken through a glass surface with water running down on it.

Best regards,
Michael
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  #14  
Old December 11th, 2013, 09:25 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Adding a recent one:

Taken through a glass surface with water running down on it.

Best regards,
Michael



This is a marvelous technique, Michael! How did you come upon it, by planning or by chance or in another photographer's work?


Asher
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  #15  
Old December 11th, 2013, 10:51 PM
Tom dinning Tom dinning is offline
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Ah! The clarity of a good idea expressed well. Who needs technical perfection, fancy gear and a head full of numbers? You might, Michael, but you can do a damn good job without them.
Please don't stop here. I'm enjoying this. Photographs for their own sake. A minor pleasure in life.
Cheers
Tom
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  #16  
Old December 12th, 2013, 07:38 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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A remarkable series, Michael! You certainly live up to the high standards you've set by your signature ;-)
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  #17  
Old December 13th, 2013, 01:45 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
This is a marvelous technique, Michael! How did you come upon it, by planning or by chance or in another photographer's work?
Hi Asher,

Thanks. I got the idea when I saw this fountain installation in the building. I do not claim being the first as this idea is not that far-fetched, but inspiration from someone else was not required here.

In order to get the desired effect for this one I had to experiment with the exposure times and longer esposure times yielded better results. Here it was 1/15 - a compromise between capturing people in a relatively stationary fashion and getting sufficient blur from the flowing water.

Best regards,
Michael
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  #18  
Old December 13th, 2013, 02:06 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Tom,

Thanks and sorry for the rant-y interjection in the other thread, but I could not leave it like this.
I will update this thread, but as I do not necessarily see it as a project, I will not shoot specifically
for this thread unless it becomes a project one day.

Best regards,
Michael
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I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.
If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
my photos on flickr - here is the portion posted in OPF.
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  #19  
Old December 13th, 2013, 02:08 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarmo Juntunen View Post
A remarkable series, Michael! You certainly live up to the high standards you've set by your signature ;-)
Hi Jarmo,

Thanks! Concerning the signature I have to admit that I am confused - what are you referring to?

Best regards,
Michael
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I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.
If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
my photos on flickr - here is the portion posted in OPF.
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  #20  
Old December 13th, 2013, 02:14 PM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Hi Jarmo,

Thanks! Concerning the signature I have to admit that I am confused - what are you referring to?

Best regards,
Michael
This perhaps?
Quote:
If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
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  #21  
Old December 14th, 2013, 02:09 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Hi Jarmo,

Thanks! Concerning the signature I have to admit that I am confused - what are you referring to?

Best regards,
Michael
Hi, I meant this:

I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.

Rgds, Jarmo
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  #22  
Old December 14th, 2013, 02:56 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarmo Juntunen View Post
Hi, I meant this:

I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.

Rgds, Jarmo
Hmmmm, that doesn't set any high standards, on the contrary!
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  #23  
Old December 14th, 2013, 03:59 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Hmmmm, that doesn't set any high standards, on the contrary!
Cem, have to disagree with you here. Michael is recording what he sees in his surroundings and life. What could be more important than that?
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  #24  
Old December 14th, 2013, 04:18 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarmo Juntunen View Post
Cem, have to disagree with you here. Michael is recording what he sees in his surroundings and life. What could be more important than that?
Importance does not equate to high standards or vice versa. ;)
Cem (the semantics police)
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  #25  
Old December 14th, 2013, 04:32 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Importance does not equate to high standards or vice versa. ;)
Cem (the semantics police)
But high standards help create important pictures. No matter how you choose to twist and turn the words.
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  #26  
Old December 14th, 2013, 04:39 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarmo Juntunen View Post
But high standards help create important pictures. No matter how you choose to twist and turn the words.
Helping to create important pictures does not mean that important pictures are of high standards nor does it mean that high standard pictures are important. I can go on like this forever Jarmo, just admit that you are wrong. ;)
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Last edited by Cem_Usakligil; December 14th, 2013 at 08:10 AM.
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  #27  
Old December 14th, 2013, 06:01 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Helping to create important pictures does it mean that important pictures are of high quality nor does or mean that high quality pictures are important. I can go on like this forever Jarmo, just admit that you are wrong. ;)
Just to clarify, Cem,

A picture that we'd consider "high quality" has to be technically well made, designed or what? Surely, a picture could be "high quality" even with poor workmanship if the image itself turns out to be spectacular? Not recommending such a strategy, but "high quality" like getting ***ed can mean so many things.

Asher
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  #28  
Old December 14th, 2013, 06:49 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
I can go on like this forever Jarmo, just admit that you are wrong. ;)
I'm sure you can. And so could I but I won't.
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  #29  
Old December 14th, 2013, 08:08 AM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
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Hi Asher,

I have just seen that I had a couple of typos in my post to which you've reacted, I have corrected them now.

What I was saying is that high standards (not high quality) and interestingness (which I know is not an official word but bear with me) are not synonyms of each other. They are not dependent on each other but can co-exist at times.
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  #30  
Old December 14th, 2013, 03:02 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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I am a little flabbergasted that my simple question led to a controversy that required the intervention of the semantics police (sorry Cem - could not resist :) ).

Maybe my signature doesn't speak enough for itself.
A few explaining words (not many, don't worry):
The first line expresses two things:
1. My lack of trust (others might call it deep distrust) in the arts business that is.
2. Don't pretend - just be - photograph what you see. This is my approach.

Standards? Whatever you call it. I do not see an advantage in setting the bar (too) high in terms of an image I might try to create of myself and my work in terms of photography. The freedom for experiments is reduced and failure is just closer than usual.

Seeing is so important and as digital photgraphy enables us to experiment in so many ways I see a creative advantage in veering away from the path of technical perfection from time to time and literally play around. The results can be disappointing but also nice and even astonishing, For me the results have an impact on how I see.

Enough words - here is another picture:




Some might notice a visual relationship with this one.

Best regards,
Michael
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I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.
If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
my photos on flickr - here is the portion posted in OPF.
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