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  #1  
Old August 6th, 2012, 05:13 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default A Remarkable Piece of Modern Photography!



NAASA: The descending rover was about 340km from MRO at the time the picture was taken

"A spectacular image of the Curiosity rover descending to the surface of Mars on its parachute has been obtained by an overflying satellite. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter played a key role in Monday's (GMT) historic landing by recording telemetry from the robot as it approached the ground. But Nasa also tasked it with trying to get a picture of the new arrival. The rover - also known as the Mars Science Laboratory, MSL - is seen when still inside its protective shell.

Moments after this image was acquired, the vehicle would have dropped out of the capsule to ride its rocket-powered crane to the base of Gale Crater, its landing location." Source


Now that's timing and getting in the right place at the right time!

Asher
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  #2  
Old August 9th, 2012, 02:53 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Curiosity: Taken during mobility testing on June 3, 2011, this image is of the Mars Science Laboratory
rover inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.


So here are the results of the very first 360 degree color pano taken with the Martian Lander Curiosity's 2MP camera.


"This is a very low-resolution panorama," explained Mike Malin, the principal investigator on the rover's Mastcam cameras. "The individual frames are only 144 by 144 pixels. There are 130 of them in there. It took us about an hour and six minutes to take the mosaic. For the full-resolution panorama, the data volume will be 64 times larger, [and] the resolution will be eight times better. But this was pretty enough and interesting enough that we thought it was worth sharing with you guys," he told BBC News.

The colour is what the camera saw. Apart from the process of blending the individual frames, the only modification made was to brighten the image slightly. Pictures are deliberately acquired underexposed so as not to saturate any bright regions in the field of view.

More here.
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  #3  
Old August 10th, 2012, 10:02 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default Curiosity's New Home



Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

"These are the first two full-resolution images of the Martian surface from the Navigation cameras on NASA's Curiosity rover, which are located on the rover's "head" or mast. The rim of Gale Crater can be seen in the distance beyond the pebbly ground. The topography of the rim is very mountainous due to erosion. The ground seen in the middle shows low-relief scarps and plains. The foreground shows two distinct zones of excavation likely carved out by blasts from the rover's descent stage thrusters. These are [from] full-resolution images, 1024 by 1024 pixels in size."

More fascinating and full size stitched images here.
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  #4  
Old August 10th, 2012, 10:25 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

"These are the first two full-resolution images of the Martian surface from the Navigation cameras on NASA's Curiosity rover, which are located on the rover's "head" or mast. The rim of Gale Crater can be seen in the distance beyond the pebbly ground. The topography of the rim is very mountainous due to erosion. The ground seen in the middle shows low-relief scarps and plains. The foreground shows two distinct zones of excavation likely carved out by blasts from the rover's descent stage thrusters. These are [from] full-resolution images, 1024 by 1024 pixels in size."

More fascinating and full size stitched images here.
love these images... thanks for posting them
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  #5  
Old August 10th, 2012, 02:42 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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love these images... thanks for posting them
Thanks,

Here's more!

This image comparison shows a view through a Hazard-Avoidance camera on NASA's Curiosity rover before and after the clear dust cover was removed. Both images were taken by a camera at the front of the rover. Mount Sharp, the mission's ultimate destination, looms ahead.





The view on the left, with the dust cover on, is one quarter of full resolution, while the view on the right is full resolution. Full-resolution images taken with the dust cover still on are not available at this time.

The only other instrument on Curiosity with a dust cover is the Mars Hand Lens Imager (or MAHLI), located on the rover's arm. In this case, the dust cover is not removed but will be opened when needed. This way, the instrument is protected from dust that may be generated from other tools on the rover's arm, in addition to wind-blown dust.



Mark,

These images will mark an historic and epic new chapter of Mars exploration by humans. We might find evidence of at least microbial life! For sure, the geology of Mars will be better understood and enough of the mineralogy and hydrology will be acquired to plan setting up bases, colonies and then terraforming the planet!

How does one function in 1/3 earth's gravity?

Asher
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  #6  
Old August 10th, 2012, 11:42 PM
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The various Mars Orbiters have allowed construction of detailed surface maps. So the route planned for the rover, curiosity, is being developed partly from what they already know of the Gale crater and what will be discovered from its cameras as it proceeds to map the area in greater detail.

Here's a picture giving an idea of relative elevations and the climb curiosity will have, of some

3 miles to reach the top of the mountain in the center of the creator if it could jump! however, to travel there, it is going to be more like about 5-6 or even 10 miles one would imagine as the rover has to choose a gradual and safe path, which likely as not, will be curved to avoid obstacles and not take risks of damage.





Topography of Gale Crater: Color coding in this image of Gale Crater on Mars represents differences in elevation. The vertical difference from a low point inside the landing ellipse for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (yellow dot) to a high point on the mountain inside the crater (red dot) is about 3 miles (5 kilometers).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Asher
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  #7  
Old August 11th, 2012, 12:03 PM
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Let me shock some of you. This adventure of photography and exploration of Mars is the direct descendant of evil intent: the revenge weapon of world War II that caused so much destruction and lost of life.

Look at this engaging video from The Science Museum, London. I wonder how far forward we were placed in having satellite based GPS, TV and telephone services by the capture of the Germans and their technology designed just to harm!

Asher
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  #8  
Old August 13th, 2012, 02:50 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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May I suggest looking at this 360° panorama presentation? Try fullscreen for the best experience.
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  #9  
Old August 13th, 2012, 03:16 PM
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May I suggest looking at this 360° panorama presentation? Try fullscreen for the best experience.
Jerome,

this is ****en mental - one of the most beautiful things i have ever seen.

anyone want to build a rocket !

thanks for posting.
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  #10  
Old August 13th, 2012, 03:25 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Jerome,

this is ****en mental - one of the most beautiful things i have ever seen.

anyone want to build a rocket !

thanks for posting.
Wait, it will be routine once they find their first veins of ruthenium, gold, platinum, iridium, copper or the like! Mining might come before terra-forming. Who'll prevent then from &*&%$ing up the planet since they's be no fish or birds too poison, no endangered species. We humans always get so technically far ahead of our social development!

Asher
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  #11  
Old August 13th, 2012, 03:59 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Wait, it will be routine once they find their first veins of ruthenium, gold, platinum, iridium, copper or the like! Mining might come before terra-forming. Who'll prevent then from &*&%$ing up the planet since they's be no fish or birds too poison, no endangered species. We humans always get so technically far ahead of our social development!

Asher
the images remind me of some of the work by O'Sullivan - the tones remind me of the albumen prints (true carftmen in those days).

on an aside note -

“Outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.”

seems like they ken us to well asher !
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  #12  
Old August 13th, 2012, 09:16 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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the images remind me of some of the work by O'Sullivan - the tones remind me of the albumen prints (true carftmen in those days).

on an aside note -

“Outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.”

seems like they ken us to well asher !

It's supposed to benefit all mankind. So how would it go when some single industrial giant decides to take all the copper. What does Banglasdesh get of it?

Asher
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  #13  
Old August 14th, 2012, 03:30 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Jerome,

this is ****en mental - one of the most beautiful things i have ever seen.

anyone want to build a rocket !

thanks for posting.
Hi Mark,

No need for a rocket, an airplane will get you to New Mexico just fine. At least that is what that page is suggesting, taken in New Mexico, that is.

I'm not sure what the source is, maybe he just made a panorama from NASA images, or used an image of a 'Curiosity' test run in the desert for a montage. It also seems unlikely that NASA would remove the camera arm from the nadir image in the composite (the last thing they would want is to alter reality and start a new hoax about everything being staged in some hollywood studio).

Cheers,
Bart
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  #14  
Old August 14th, 2012, 05:16 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Hi Mark,

No need for a rocket, an airplane will get you to New Mexico just fine. At least that is what that page is suggesting, taken in New Mexico, that is.

I'm not sure what the source is, maybe he just made a panorama from NASA images, or used an image of a 'Curiosity' test run in the desert for a montage. It also seems unlikely that NASA would remove the camera arm from the nadir image in the composite (the last thing they would want is to alter reality and start a new hoax about everything being staged in some hollywood studio).

Cheers,
Bart
Bart,

I await my ticket from you !

that landscape gets me - better do some diggin - but hey - all my work is fiction.

cheers
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  #15  
Old August 14th, 2012, 09:14 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Bart,

I await my ticket from you !
Hi Mark,

Sorry to disappoint you, I just gave away the last one.

To compensate, allow me to offer a link to some more 360 degree VR panoramas, of the most beautiful/interesting places in the world, taken from an unusual vantage point (hovering above the ground): http://www.airpano.com/

There is quite a number of jaw droppers amongst those very skillfully made Panos.

Cheers,
Bart
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  #16  
Old August 14th, 2012, 01:18 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Hi Mark,

Sorry to disappoint you, I just gave away the last one.

To compensate, allow me to offer a link to some more 360 degree VR panoramas, of the most beautiful/interesting places in the world, taken from an unusual vantage point (hovering above the ground): http://www.airpano.com/

There is quite a number of jaw droppers amongst those very skillfully made Panos.

Cheers,
Bart
Bart,

i am disjointedness - the ticket no happening makes me sad - the link is very cool . thanks !
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  #17  
Old August 16th, 2012, 04:57 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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  #18  
Old August 16th, 2012, 09:12 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Jerome,

Clarity!

I'd imagine that video games, cosmetics, candies, cupcakes and ice-cream could dwarf that!

Asher
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  #19  
Old August 16th, 2012, 09:59 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Video games: $65 billion (source)

Cosmetics, worldwide: $170 billion (source)

The global confectionery market was valued at approximately $147 billion USD in 2008 (source)

I'll pass on cupcakes and ice cream.
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  #20  
Old August 16th, 2012, 12:33 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Video games: $65 billion (source)

Cosmetics, worldwide: $170 billion (source)

The global confectionery market was valued at approximately $147 billion USD in 2008 (source)

I'll pass on cupcakes and ice cream.
£13 tn - an estimate on money hidden offshore to avoid tax.

i will pass the sick bag
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  #21  
Old August 16th, 2012, 01:52 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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"This image taken by NASA's Curiosity shows what lies ahead for the rover -- its main science target, Mount Sharp. The rover's shadow can be seen in the foreground, and the dark bands beyond are dunes. Rising up in the distance is Mount Sharp, whose peak is 3.4 miles (5.5 kilometers) high, taller than Mt. Whitney in California. The actual summit is not visible from this vantage point -- the highest elevation seen in this view is about 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) above the rover. The Curiosity team hopes to drive the rover to the mountain to investigate its lower layers, which scientists think hold clues to past environmental change.

This image was captured by the rover's front left Hazard-Avoidance camera at full resolution shortly after it landed. It has been linearized to remove the distorted appearance that results from its fisheye lens."
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  #22  
Old August 16th, 2012, 02:16 PM
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"This image taken by NASA's Curiosity shows what lies ahead for the rover -- its main science target, Mount Sharp. The rover's shadow can be seen in the foreground, and the dark bands beyond are dunes. Rising up in the distance is Mount Sharp, whose peak is 3.4 miles (5.5 kilometers) high, taller than Mt. Whitney in California. The actual summit is not visible from this vantage point -- the highest elevation seen in this view is about 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) above the rover. The Curiosity team hopes to drive the rover to the mountain to investigate its lower layers, which scientists think hold clues to past environmental change.

This image was captured by the rover's front left Hazard-Avoidance camera at full resolution shortly after it landed. It has been linearized to remove the distorted appearance that results from its fisheye lens."
just about the most beautiful thing not on earth... thanks for updateing
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  #23  
Old September 20th, 2012, 05:57 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Curiosity has now advanced a total of 289 meters on its journey to Geleig, just 200 meters to go. On the way, it has found a 25cm, (10 inch), high stone pyramid. I doubt that there are treasures within, or hieroglyphics, but wouldn't that be simply fabulous, miniature ancient Pharaohs with a whole lot of wisdom for us to digest! The Scientologists would rejoice, Tom Cruse would leap over Oprah Winfrey declaring L Ron Hubbard the visionary of our times. The Vatican, however, would retreat to the catacombs beneath Rome to look up all the old texts they have banned eons ago.





JPL: The target rock has been named in honour of a rover engineer, Jake Matijevic, who died in August (via BBC)


Catch up with what's new on Mars here!

Asher
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  #24  
Old September 28th, 2012, 04:21 PM
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Well, something new today. We now have water-worn pebble evidence of a running stream on Mars, maybe a foot or so deep.




NASA: Rover Finds Old Streambed on Martian Surface


"From the size of gravels it carried, we can interpret the water was moving about 3 feet per second, with a depth somewhere between ankle and hip deep," said Curiosity science co-investigator William Dietrich of the University of California, Berkeley. "Plenty of papers have been written about channels on Mars with many different hypotheses about the flows in them. This is the first time we're actually seeing water-transported gravel on Mars. This is a transition from speculation about the size of streambed material to direct observation of it."

Source


I am waiting for organic materials! With all the iron oxide there, what else might be lurking there from times when it was more hospitable to life?

Asher
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  #25  
Old November 2nd, 2012, 04:35 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Well, it had to happen! a self-portrait stitched from curiosity's arm length camera, just like earthlings do with iPhones, LOL. But this is stitched from over 50 individual frames taken 150 million miles away from it's controllers on planet earth!



Curiosity, courtesy NASA: Curiosity Self Portrait After First Ground Scoops and Journey in Gale Crater

Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to capture this set of 55 high-resolution images

On Sol 84 (Oct. 31, 2012), NASA's Curiosity rover used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to capture this set of 55 high-resolution images, which were stitched together to create this full-color self-portrait.

The mosaic shows the rover at "Rocknest," the spot in Gale Crater where the mission's first scoop sampling took place. Four scoop scars can be seen in the regolith in front of the rover.

The base of Gale Crater's 3-mile-high (5-kilometer) sedimentary mountain, Mount Sharp, rises on the right side of the frame. Mountains in the background to the left are the northern wall of Gale Crater. The Martian landscape appears inverted within the round, reflective ChemCam instrument at the top of the rover's mast.

Self-portraits like this one document the state of the rover and allow mission engineers to track changes over time, such as dust accumulation and wheel wear. Due to its location on the end of the robotic arm, only MAHLI (among the rover's 17 cameras) is able to image some parts of the craft, including the port-side wheels.

This high-resolution mosaic is a more detailed version of the low-resolution version created with thumbnail images, at: NASA's Photojournal Site .

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems



See more images of the Mars expedition and Curiosities adventures here
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  #26  
Old November 2nd, 2012, 07:03 PM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Self-portraits like this one document the state of the rover and allow mission engineers to track changes over time, such as dust accumulation and wheel wear. Due to its location on the end of the robotic arm, only MAHLI (among the rover's 17 cameras) is able to image some parts of the craft, including the port-side wheels.
Hi Asher,

Some self-portrait, isn't it. Or is it food for conspiracy lovers asking themselves, who was holding the camera ...?

Cheers,
Bart
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  #27  
Old November 4th, 2012, 02:36 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Well, it had to happen! a self-portrait stitched from curiosity's arm length camera, just like earthlings do with iPhones, LOL. But this is stitched from over 50 individual frames taken 150 million miles away from it's controllers on planet earth!



Curiosity, courtesy NASA: Curiosity Self Portrait After First Ground Scoops and Journey in Gale Crater

Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to capture this set of 55 high-resolution images

On Sol 84 (Oct. 31, 2012), NASA's Curiosity rover used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to capture this set of 55 high-resolution images, which were stitched together to create this full-color self-portrait.

The mosaic shows the rover at "Rocknest," the spot in Gale Crater where the mission's first scoop sampling took place. Four scoop scars can be seen in the regolith in front of the rover.

The base of Gale Crater's 3-mile-high (5-kilometer) sedimentary mountain, Mount Sharp, rises on the right side of the frame. Mountains in the background to the left are the northern wall of Gale Crater. The Martian landscape appears inverted within the round, reflective ChemCam instrument at the top of the rover's mast.

Self-portraits like this one document the state of the rover and allow mission engineers to track changes over time, such as dust accumulation and wheel wear. Due to its location on the end of the robotic arm, only MAHLI (among the rover's 17 cameras) is able to image some parts of the craft, including the port-side wheels.

This high-resolution mosaic is a more detailed version of the low-resolution version created with thumbnail images, at: NASA's Photojournal Site .

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems



See more images of the Mars expedition and Curiosities adventures here
that is a crazy mo fo of a picture .... thanks for keeping this updated asher

and thanks for the link as well bart .....
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  #28  
Old November 5th, 2012, 12:21 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Mark, Jerome & Bart,

Thanks for the comments! This, for a change is a totally rational project and so much more efficient than sending people at this stage in our knowledge. This is brilliant engineering, one of the greatest achievements of man!

Asher
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  #29  
Old January 8th, 2013, 09:56 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Well, at last we are getting close to the first use of the hammer drill to get a pristine fine-powder sample of an interesting rock for the Mars Rover to analyze. first curiosity brushed the surface clean with its rotating wire brush and took a nice picture for us:

Here's a small version:




This image is from the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity showing the patch of rock cleaned
by the first use of the rover's Dust Removal Tool (DRT).
(Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)


and now the original image:



This could be one of the first Martian works of art! You're invited to download the large image and derive art from it. Post the results here

Asher
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  #30  
Old January 9th, 2013, 11:08 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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While we're getting ready to see the first hammer-drilling on Mars, let's go back to Jan 3rd to see this brief look at "Snake River"





'Snake River' Rock Feature Viewed by Curiosity Mars Rover: The sinuous rock feature in the lower center of this mosaic of
images recorded by the NASA Mars rover Curiosity is called "Snake River."The images in the mosaic were taken by Curiosity's
Navigation Camera during the 133rd Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Dec. 20, 2012). On Sol 147 (Jan. 3,
2013), Curiosity drove about 10 feet (3 meters) to get a closer look at Snake River for before proceeding to other nearby rocks.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


I'd have no hesitation imagining water rushing through here some short while back! There's very little difference between life and death, just an ability to drink water and dance!

Asher
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