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  #1  
Old February 14th, 2008, 12:52 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default Carry-with-me-always" camera? Reviews/experiences: Is yours also a Canon G9?

We all watched in disappointment and even feelings of betrayal as Canon dropped RAW from it's digicams relegating the competent G series of Canon cameras to just another good point and shoot. The introduction of the 12 MP Canon G9 brought back the G series to the professional photographers'good favor.

Uwe and Bettina Steinmueller have been running a G9 diary "inspired by an article "The Canon Powershot G9 in Japan". They share details of their workflow and cover features pointing out the good and what might be done better. Now there appears a rather nice human touch of how one photographer, Paul Nakroshis, has had the G9 with him for the past 5 months and it has perhaps even altered the way he views the world, as pictures to be taken. Maybe we all do that to some extent!


© Paul Nakroshis Outback Photo.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Nakroshis
For starters, Iím simply taking more pictures because itís easy to carry this camera with me, and its unobtrusive in a manner that a 1D just isnít. Although Iíve had my 1D for several years now, Iíve only taken around 8000 frames with it, mostly landscapes. In the 5 months Iíve had the G9, Iíve taken almost 1600 photographs. I take the G9 everywhere, when I walk the dog, go to the sledding hill with my kids, when I drive to work, even when I go to the grocery store.

As a result of carrying the camera with me, I end up seeing and thinking photographically much more often (Thinking photographically while driving on snow covered Maine roadways can be a dangerous activity!). As has been said, the only good camera is one that is with you when you need it. The G9 fills this niche very nicely for me.
Source . Diary by Uwe and Bettina here.

So, what is your experience with the G9 and do you have this or another "carry-with-me-always" camera?

Asher
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  #2  
Old February 14th, 2008, 02:09 AM
Georg R. Baumann Georg R. Baumann is offline
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Hi Asher,

I used to have a Konica Minolta Z5 with me all the time, but I gave it away as a gift, mainly for lack of RAW as you said.

I am considering this G9 for myself after I saw this particulary gallery of Max Lyons here:

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/cg....pl?gallery=18
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  #3  
Old February 14th, 2008, 04:13 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georg Baumann View Post
I am considering this G9 for myself after I saw this particulary gallery of Max Lyons here:

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/cg....pl?gallery=18
Max's panoramas are beautiful, and the G9 certainly looks like a capable camera with the latest technology. However, besides the photographer's skills, part of the beauty of the images is caused by the wonderful landscapes, and the fact that they are panorama's.

Looking at images from the G9 and other small sensel camera's, I do get the impression that dynamic range is limited. Images where the highlights are properly rendered tend to have murky shadows, and properly rendered shadows quickly lead to clipped highlights. Mind you, for the purpose of portability, a very rich feature set, and overall image quality, the G9 is one of the better models, no doubt.

Of course, since recent software developments it has become much easier to combine pano stitching with exposure blending/fusion. That will allow to exceed the camera's inherent dynamic range limitations, with stationary subjects. Max Lyons has released a new version of his own (Windows based) Panorama application, and has also added his own free version of 'Enfuse', called 'TuFuse' which allows to automatically combine focus bracketed and exposure bracketed image stacks.

Bart
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  #4  
Old February 14th, 2008, 05:06 AM
J Jon Salt J Jon Salt is offline
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I feel the same way about my G5, that's why I still have and use it.
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  #5  
Old February 14th, 2008, 05:13 PM
Martin Kuivenhoven Martin Kuivenhoven is offline
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Smile

Even I have got one.. a G9 with underwater housing and based on Diane's enthusiast writing a lensmate adaptor. Took it with me on a family trip tot Disney, without time to read the manual, and results were quite usable (at least to my standards).

Most surprising to me is the effectiveness of the IS


Example of IS only, 1/10th @ 60mm handheld

And the responce to filters, the effects seems to come out a lot stronger then on my E-1.

Playing with the underwaterhousing will be another interesting challange..

So far so good, me being the limiting factor for now!
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  #6  
Old February 14th, 2008, 07:28 PM
Ken Tanaka Ken Tanaka is offline
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Yes, my G9 would have to be considered my "go anywhere" camera. I've found it to be a superb tool.

A few samples of images taken with my G9.


Iron workers, Chicago


LaSalle Street Bridge, Chicago


Dinnerware


Rainy night above Lake Shore Drive
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  #7  
Old February 14th, 2008, 09:09 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Ken, the last 2 pictures are pretty close to fine for publication.

Martin, is there a disneyland in Holland?

Asher
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  #8  
Old February 14th, 2008, 09:15 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart_van_der_Wolf View Post
Of course, since recent software developments it has become much easier to combine pano stitching with exposure blending/fusion. That will allow to exceed the camera's inherent dynamic range limitations, with stationary subjects. Max Lyons has released a new version of his own (Windows based) Panorama application, and has also added his own free version of 'Enfuse', called 'TuFuse' which allows to automatically combine focus bracketed and exposure bracketed image stacks.

Bart
You are quite right Bart. If one can take close pictures or at least develop pictures differently from RAW then the new software aligns the pixels and combine the best exposed ones. As this gets better, we should have the software automatically do it from 1 or two RAW pics.

BTW, how fast does this camera do bracketing and recording 3 shots in RAw format?

Asher
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  #9  
Old February 14th, 2008, 11:25 PM
Uwe Steinmueller Uwe Steinmueller is offline
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>BTW, how fast does this camera do bracketing and recording 3 shots in RAw format?

Better you don't use the term "fast". I would call it ultra slow. A slow 5D is a speed monster compared to the G9. I bracket a lot but not with the G9. Life is too short.

Uwe
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  #10  
Old February 14th, 2008, 11:31 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Thanks for the reply Uwe,

So how do you cover ranges of light going beyond the cameras normal capability? Do you just shoot sequential jpgs, especially since you are so interested in tone mapping?

Asher
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  #11  
Old February 15th, 2008, 06:07 AM
David A. Goldfarb David A. Goldfarb is offline
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Voigtlander Perkeo II--a folding 6x6 camera that's smaller than many 35mm rangefinders. I experimented with a few different folders and settled on this one as the best balance of size, film flatness, lens quality, and ergonomics.

If Fuji manufactures their 6x7 folder, though, I may switch.







Here's one in color--

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...1&d=1193614634
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  #12  
Old February 15th, 2008, 07:41 AM
Georg R. Baumann Georg R. Baumann is offline
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Flippin Heck... <smile>

This camera was manufactured between 1952-1955 if I am not mistaken.

Brilliant!
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  #13  
Old February 15th, 2008, 08:54 AM
David A. Goldfarb David A. Goldfarb is offline
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That's about right. I think of it as the "pocketblad."
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  #14  
Old February 15th, 2008, 10:07 AM
Ken Tanaka Ken Tanaka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
Voigtlander Perkeo II--a folding 6x6 camera that's smaller than many 35mm rangefinders. I experimented with a few different folders and settled on this one as the best balance of size, film flatness, lens quality, and ergonomics.

If Fuji manufactures their 6x7 folder, though, I may switch.
I had never seen this camera, Perhaps you've not, either. So I looked it up.

Here are some good looks at what appears to be vintage examples of all three models, courtesy of Jurgen Kreckel of "Vintage Folding Cameras"

Here is a bit of lineage and history, courtesy of "UK Camera".
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Old February 15th, 2008, 11:22 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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Off topic, but as you're talking about old cameras, I wanted to have a look to my very first one, this was in 1959 or 60 (I got the Flash laterÖ):


Courtesy of this French site (sorry ;-)
They do have a lot of old ones, maybe you'll find the one from your 'enfance'Ö

http://www.collection-appareils.fr/
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  #16  
Old February 15th, 2008, 12:22 PM
Georg R. Baumann Georg R. Baumann is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
That's about right. I think of it as the "pocketblad."
ROFLMAO, nice! <smile>
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  #17  
Old February 15th, 2008, 09:42 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
Voigtlander Perkeo II--a folding 6x6 camera that's smaller than many 35mm rangefinders. I experimented with a few different folders and settled on this one as the best balance of size, film flatness, lens quality, and ergonomics.

If Fuji manufactures their 6x7 folder, though, I may switch.



Here's one in color--

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...1&d=1193614634
David,

The camera is wonderful in your hands. I'm so impressed with what you have done. The lens does so well to the Grant's Tomb. What's the church on the left? The one in color, I'd love to see but even though I log into Rangefinder.com it does not allow the image to appear!

What are the dimensions?

Asher
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  #18  
Old February 15th, 2008, 09:54 PM
Alain Briot Alain Briot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post

So how do you cover ranges of light going beyond the cameras normal capability?

Asher
I can't speak for Uwe but personally, well, . . . I don't!

I use the 1DsMk2 for that!
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  #19  
Old February 15th, 2008, 10:17 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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But, Alain,

Is the 1DsII with you all the time? We're talking about the "Carry-with-me-always" camera and the the 1DsII in my pocket would be uncomfortable, to say the least!

Asher
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  #20  
Old February 15th, 2008, 10:44 PM
David A. Goldfarb David A. Goldfarb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
David,

The camera is wonderful in your hands. I'm so impressed with what you have done. The lens does so well to the Grant's Tomb. What's the church on the left? The one in color, I'd love to see but even though I log into Rangefinder.com it does not allow the image to appear!

What are the dimensions?

Asher
Hmmm...not sure why the link to the RFF isn't working. Maybe try this, and then click on the thumbnail--

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...15&postcount=3

The church is the Riverside Church (formerly led by the peace activist, William Sloane Coffin). The modern slab behind it is The Interchurch Center, which houses administrative offices of various religious organizations, including the national headquarters of Alcoholics Anonymous.

The Perkeo II is approximately 4-7/8 x 1-5/8 (including the bulge for the lens--1-3/16 without) x 3-3/8 inches (LxDxH), when folded. I use it with an uncoupled shoe-mount rangefinder, which adds about another 7/8 inch to the top. I haven't weighed it, but one site I found says it's 1.5 lbs, which is believable.
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Old February 15th, 2008, 10:58 PM
Alain Briot Alain Briot is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
But, Alain,

Is the 1DsII with you all the time? We're talking about the "Carry-with-me-always" camera and the the 1DsII in my pocket would be uncomfortable, to say the least!

Asher
Of course not - too big! What I mean is with the G9 I don't do HDR-oriented captures.
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  #22  
Old February 15th, 2008, 11:10 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Now I see it, David!



Nice color. So this was hand held, as the distant gold arch work is beautiful but closer objects are softer.

How often do you use this? I wonder how big and heavy it is? Also is the 6x9 version much bigger?

Asher
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  #23  
Old February 15th, 2008, 11:33 PM
Kathy Rappaport Kathy Rappaport is offline
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That, Nicolas, was my mother's Brownie! I had to learn how to load the film in it - too complicated for my Mother to do (ha ha). Oh do I remember the pop! of the flash. It was replaced by the Instamatic I got for my birthday when I was about 9. The Kodak Instamatic had a flash cube!
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Old February 16th, 2008, 12:09 AM
Ken Tanaka Ken Tanaka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post
Off topic, but as you're talking about old cameras, I wanted to have a look to my very first one, this was in 1959 or 60 (I got the Flash laterÖ):


Courtesy of this French site (sorry ;-)
They do have a lot of old ones, maybe you'll find the one from your 'enfance'Ö

http://www.collection-appareils.fr/
Only real cameras were made of Bakelite! I'll bet that body would shatter like glass if it was dropped today.

That Brownie was the most successful line of cameras to-date, due largely to its low cost (the first box Brownie cost only $1) and ease of use. Kodak sold them, in a succession of models, for over 80 years. I believe that it's the camera model that was launched with the marketing slogan, "You press the button, we do the rest."

It's interesting to note that far below the exalted halls of sophisticated photo tech circles Kodak is trying to use the same basic low-cost/simplicity of use formula to recreate the Brownie's success. Today's Brownie line is called "Easy Share" and it's been the largest selling line of digital cameras for at least the past two years.
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Old February 16th, 2008, 02:24 AM
Georg R. Baumann Georg R. Baumann is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Tanaka View Post
Only real cameras were made of Bakelite!

BAEKELAND, Leo Hendrik, Chemist. *11/14/1863 in Gent (Belgium), + 2/23/1944


Hehehe, I remember them!

Journey back in time:

http://www.bakelitmuseum.de/

Bakelit:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakelite
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Old February 16th, 2008, 03:03 AM
Georg R. Baumann Georg R. Baumann is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy Rappaport View Post
Oh do I remember the pop! of the flash. It was replaced by the Instamatic I got for my birthday when I was about 9. The Kodak Instamatic had a flash cube!
<grins>I got my first one when I was 12, a Agfamatic 2000, it was known as a "ritsch... ratsch... klick" for the sound it made when you transported the film.





http://apphotnum.free.fr/Agfamatic1-e.html
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  #27  
Old February 16th, 2008, 05:20 AM
David A. Goldfarb David A. Goldfarb is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Now I see it, David!

Nice color. So this was hand held, as the distant gold arch work is beautiful but closer objects are softer.

How often do you use this? I wonder how big and heavy it is? Also is the 6x9 version much bigger?

Asher
Thanks. The film was Fuji RMS most likely, which was discontinued when Provia 400F came out.

I didn't have a tripod with me at the time, and I think I braced the camera against a pillar or railing, if I remember correctly. From the motion of the people in the foreground, the exposure was probably 1/10 or 1/5 sec. (the shutter is marked in those speeds).

When I'm not carrying another camera, I usually have this one in my coat pocket or briefcase, so I use it fairly often. It's tiny like a 35mm rangefinder camera, probably a little lighter than a Leica M7.

I've owned the 6x9 Bessa II with the outstanding 105mm Color-Heliar, and it is somewhat larger, but still fits in a coat pocket. In general 6x9 folding cameras are prone to film flatness issues. The Bessa II is one of the best 6x9 folders, having the attraction of a coupled rangefinder, but I found it a bit awkward to hold steady, particularly in the horizontal position. The shutter release is on the left side on the door that closes to cover the lens, which is mechanically very clever, but it made the camera too left-handed for me. The photograph of the decayed pier that you liked on my website was made with that camera.

Last edited by Asher Kelman; February 16th, 2008 at 10:22 AM.
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  #28  
Old February 16th, 2008, 11:59 AM
Martin Kuivenhoven Martin Kuivenhoven is offline
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..

Martin, is there a disneyland in Holland?

Asher
Euro Disney in Paris, France is a 4 and a half hours drive away. Not that far and Euro Disney is maturing into quite a nice park (if you are into this kind of thing)

Martin
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Old March 15th, 2008, 04:00 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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The Canon G9 is praised a lot. What is your favorite other take-with-me-always camera.

Sony, Fuji, Olympus, Casio, Ricoh or what? GR II is the choice of John Nevill here , worth reading!

What are the rest of us missing?

My eyes are on a Ricoh.

Asher
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  #30  
Old March 17th, 2008, 12:48 AM
Mike Funnell Mike Funnell is offline
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Different people seem to have different ideas of what "take anywhere" means. I always have a little Canon Ixus 40 (aka SD300) in my pocket as a "notepad camera". Its beat-up, has a big ding on the bottom plate, once went with me for an unscheduled swim - and can still take a decent-enough photo. Admittedly, it takes more shots of equipment assemblies, whiteboards and business cards than more entertaining subjects. I usually have another camera with me - most often a Leica M3 with collapsible 50 in a small bag/pouch or an Olympus mju:II (aka Stylus Epic) in a belt pouch (sometimes replaced by a Contax T2). Or some other camera if I'm planning something specific. At work, I keep a Konica Auto S3 and some film - just in case I need a "real" camera and don't have anything more suitable with me.

...Mike
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