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View Full Version : [UV, BV, VIS] Russian Mars Lens meets Rudbeckia fulgida


Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 10th, 2010, 05:22 PM
Well, some long time ago I was able to "liberate" the last two surviving multispectral quartz fluorite lenses from the russian mission to Mars. Made by LOMO and designed by GOI, they represent (to me) a top result of the designers under Prof. Volossov who headed the optical design department of GOI in St Petersburg. Transmission is flat approx. 65% for 230...1000nm. Center resolution is approx. 80lpm

Long story short, here now some results using that no-focusshift lens...

VIS:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296669/original.jpg

UV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296668/original.jpg


BV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296667/original.jpg

Here a detail crop ... note the spider webs.

http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128297243/original.jpg

Andy brown
September 10th, 2010, 05:40 PM
Well, some long time ago I was able to "liberate" the last two surviving multispectral quartz fluorite lenses from the russian mission to Mars.


Wow Doctor, that's just brilliant.
Maybe to you it was all in a day's work (I doubt it) but I'm doing all kinds of cloak and dagger scenarios as to just how you 'liberated' the lenses. Please tell me there were trench coats involved and seedy characters with scars named Vladimir and Sergei.

Wonderful results.

/ meanwhile, I can barely smuggle myself out the door to get a decent photo.

Asher Kelman
September 11th, 2010, 01:06 AM
Well, some long time ago I was able to "liberate" the last two surviving multispectral quartz fluorite lenses from the russian mission to Mars. Made by LOMO and designed by GOI, they represent (to me) a top result of the designers under Prof. Volossov who headed the optical design department of GOI in St Petersburg. Transmission is flat approx. 65% for 230...1000nm. Center resolution is approx. 80lpm

So all these pictures are made with the same lens, but you use filters to exclude the light beyond 400-700 nm in the first case, above 400 nm for the UV and I'm not sure what BV is?

Long story short, here now some results using that no-focusshift lens... Tell us about the lens it has "no focus shift" for different wavelength.

VIS:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296669/original.jpg

The composition itself is pleasing. This is a very striking image and would be great printed huge.

UV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296668/original.jpg


Why purple?

BV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128296667/original.jpg

I had to look up BV!!! These are terms from astronomy where using different sets of filters

"The magnitude of the star is measured first through a standardized B-band ("blue") filter. Then the star's magnitude is measured through a V-band ("visible", peaking in green) filter. The value of V is subtracted from B to get the B-V colour index.

As a star gets cooler and therefore more red, the B-V colour index increases, since smaller magnitudes correspond to brighter light. Hot stars have a small B-V and cool stars have a large B-V. Hotter stars therefore appear to the left on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and cooler stars appear on the right." Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B-V_colour)

However, even after my research, I'm not sure what filters you used. Is this just a subtraction?

This is interesting stuff. I'd be hoping to see some hidden structures or markings that help the flower attract insects, LOL!

Asher

Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 11th, 2010, 01:13 AM
Sorry, "BV" stands for (simulated) Butterfly Vision where UV is mapped into the image as blue, but leaving green and red intact.

The lens is designed using quartz and fluorite and color corrected so UV and visible light image are in the same focus plane

Asher Kelman
September 11th, 2010, 01:20 AM
Sorry, "BV" stands for (simulated) Butterfly Vision where UV is mapped into the image as blue, but leaving green and red intact.

The lens is designed using quartz and fluorite and color corrected so UV and visible light image are in the same focus plane


Klaus,

So you replace the blue channel completely with the UV image but how do you scale it?

Asher

Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 11th, 2010, 01:24 AM
Long before I used two or even three images and mounted them together, today I use a special proprietary filter and I have the result in just one shot - this is why ideally the lens has no focus shift in the various wavebands used.

Asher Kelman
September 11th, 2010, 01:33 AM
Long before I used two or even three images and mounted them together, today I use a special proprietary filter and I have the result in just one shot - this is why ideally the lens has no focus shift in the various wavebands used.

How do we know about perception of the butterfly? Have you tried remapping it yourself fro creative effect? Or, does hard science tell us that would be really misrepresenting what the butterfly sees?

I have some feelings of surprise at the BV result since I rely on nature to be pleasing. The color effects of the BV version are harsh and almost posterized because of sudden transitions. Is there a more gentle and nuance presentation possible?

Look what that lens delivers in the first picture!

Asher

Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 11th, 2010, 02:26 AM
Nature functions the way it wants to, irrespectible of whether we like it or not and of course it is surprising to see such "hidden" patterns. They always amazed me (still do) but I never felt that way to find them harsh. I guess they have to considering the very limited optical system of a honey bee or butterfly, which can only see good very closeup. From far they need strong signals to be attracted, be it colors, patterns etc. This is hard science since decades and has been well published (I work with some of these researchers btw.). A good source is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromacy

Dr Klaus Schmitt
November 10th, 2010, 03:08 AM
These images (amongst others) have been chosen to be published by Focal Press for their new 9th edition of "Langford's Advanced Photography"

Asher Kelman
November 10th, 2010, 11:02 AM
These images (amongst others) have been chosen to be published by Focal Press for their new 9th edition of "Langford's Advanced Photography"

Once again your work is honored and you deserve it. Well done Klaus! We're very proud of you!

Congratulations!

Asher

Bart_van_der_Wolf
November 10th, 2010, 02:07 PM
These images (amongst others) have been chosen to be published by Focal Press for their new 9th edition of "Langford's Advanced Photography"

Hi Klaus,

Congratulations with the publication.

Cheers,
Bart

Dr Klaus Schmitt
November 11th, 2010, 05:23 PM
Thanks guys!

Dr Klaus Schmitt
February 8th, 2011, 06:34 PM
These images (amongst a few others) made it into the new Langford's Advanced Photography, 8th edition (http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.editors/722679/description#description)

Craig Smith
May 1st, 2012, 04:46 PM
I actually prefer the original over the rest. But no 3 is nice too. Gives off a retro mood to the photograph.

Dr Klaus Schmitt
May 18th, 2012, 02:54 AM
Thanks Craig.