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View Full Version : [VIS, UV,BV] Helianthus tuberosus (Topinambur)


Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 16th, 2010, 03:58 PM
Last summer I took quite a few shots using my butterfly vision (BV) filter, since found out that bees and bumblebees seem to be very fond of visiting Topinambur flowers (Helianthus tuberosus, also called "Jerusalem Artichoke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_artichoke)") [the roots were used in former times here to make that famous Topinambur liquor]. So today here a few shots, to reveal in more detail, how that flower looks like and the very prominent UV pattern it has.

Visible:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128495277/original.jpg

UV (310-390nm):
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128495276/original.jpg

Butterfly vision (simulated, UV mapped in as blue):
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128495273/original.jpg

Mark Hampton
September 16th, 2010, 04:09 PM
Butterfly vision (simulated, UV mapped in as blue):
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/128495273/original.jpg

Dr,

this to me is working... beautiful...

thanks

Asher Kelman
September 16th, 2010, 09:24 PM
Dr,

this to me is working... beautiful...

thanks

Klaus,

Like Mark, I appreciate especially the butterfly vision. Somehow it seems to present the center of the flower with all it's myriads of miniature trumpets, as a "bespoke" crowd of flowers, of a finer class. Have you looked at how different these images are when transformed, as best as you can judge, to black and white. I wonder if there are these differences too?

Asher

Dr Klaus Schmitt
September 17th, 2010, 04:02 PM
Thanks guys. I have looked at bw versions of my work in earlier stages when it was still necessary to overlay RGB layers to achieve the desired results and these differences were also visible there.

Asher Kelman
September 18th, 2010, 09:55 PM
Thanks guys. I have looked at bw versions of my work in earlier stages when it was still necessary to overlay RGB layers to achieve the desired results and these differences were also visible there.

Klaus,

So, does this then offer another interesting route to B&W, the butterfly vision view, or do you think it has no special interest over IR alone?

Asher