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View Full Version : [VIS, UV] A Bouquet of Mexican Zinnias


Dr Klaus Schmitt
December 5th, 2011, 05:02 PM
Shot July this year, just discovered while digging through files for a project.

VIS:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127868/original.jpg

UV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127869/original.jpg

showing these interesting UV reflection patterns reaching deep into the UV-A domain.

For your (hopefully) viewing pleasure in these dull and cold days...

Mark Hampton
October 23rd, 2012, 03:07 PM
Shot July this year, just discovered while digging through files for a project.

VIS:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127868/original.jpg

UV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127869/original.jpg

showing these interesting UV reflection patterns reaching deep into the UV-A domain.

For your (hopefully) viewing pleasure in these dull and cold days...

this needs seen again.

Asher Kelman
January 2nd, 2013, 09:54 AM
Shot July this year, just discovered while digging through files for a project.

VIS:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127868/original.jpg

UV:
http://www.pbase.com/kds315/image/140127869/original.jpg

showing these interesting UV reflection patterns reaching deep into the UV-A domain.

For your (hopefully) viewing pleasure in these dull and cold days...


Klaus,

The B&W look is stunning. An excellent result!

In the UV image, the insects would see tiny reflections from the pollen, as they landed. but where is the nectar and is it black for them or can they see the red and hello too?

Is there any way insects can modulate the mixture of light or are all receptors equally sensitive to UV and visible light to a fixed extent and always "on"? As the eyes don't have a cover, what do they do when they are resting? I'd think they have a way of switching off the input. If that's so then they might do that for selective use of wavelengths!

Asher

Dr Klaus Schmitt
January 2nd, 2013, 10:18 AM
Thanks Asher, quite some old posting actually.

I would guess, once that UV pattern has done its intended work and has attracted the bee (insect) from far (bees only see unsharp far away) and made it approach, also smell gets important and allows the bee to find the honey (pollen is less attractive and more collected as a by product).

The bee's eye is most sensitive to UV, then to blue, then to green and a tiny bit orange red. It has three receptors similar to us i.e. bees are trichromats.

Jerome Marot
January 2nd, 2013, 10:36 PM
pollen is less attractive and more collected as a by product

Pollen is essential food for bee brood and can be in more limited supply than nectar. It would thus seem that bees need a way so seek and collect pollen.