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  #1  
Old June 28th, 2014, 10:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Default Bird Pairs!

Spotted in mangrove areas of fresh water estuary to Pacific Ocean today 10 km north of Manuel Antonio park in Costa Rica.



Asher Kelman: A Colorful Pair


Can you name this pair and perhaps the yellow bird in the upper right too, perhaps a flycatcher?

Asher
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  #2  
Old June 29th, 2014, 06:26 AM
Robert Watcher Robert Watcher is offline
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Looks like you're off to a great start in Costa Rica, Asher. Your image brought me back to Manuel Antonio where Anne and I witnessed these striking black birds with vibrant red on their side. You are correct that you have captured both the male and female. The kind is "Cherrie's Tanager".

I can't see enough details on the bird in the back to recognize. It can be a challenge identifying birds in CR because there are literally hundreds of breeds and variations to view on any given day. Continue to enjoy.



-----
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  #3  
Old June 29th, 2014, 12:14 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Watcher View Post
Looks like you're off to a great start in Costa Rica, Asher. Your image brought me back to Manuel Antonio where Anne and I witnessed these striking black birds with vibrant red on their side. You are correct that you have captured both the male and female. The kind is "Cherrie's Tanager".

I can't see enough details on the bird in the back to recognize. It can be a challenge identifying birds in CR because there are literally hundreds of breeds and variations to view on any given day. Continue to enjoy.



-----
Thanks for the ID's, Robert. It would be fun to see how many pairs we might be able to assemble here!


Asher
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  #4  
Old July 10th, 2014, 08:32 AM
Doug Herr Doug Herr is offline
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There are actually three birds in this picture, a pair of squabbling Northern Harriers and the object of their discussion, parts of an American Coot (Yolo County California)



A very old photo of Gilded Flickers made on High-speed Ektachrome (remember that stuff? Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Arizona)



Yellow-billed Magpies (Alameda County California)



Mountain Chickadees (Sierra County California)



Bending the rules a little, a trio of Common Mynas (Makapu'u Hawaii)



Cedar Waxwings in my neighbor's persimmon tree (Sacramento County California)

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  #5  
Old July 10th, 2014, 08:48 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Such a spread of wonderful birds, Doug! I am going to study them. right now I'm so impressed and enthralled!

Asher
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  #6  
Old July 16th, 2014, 05:20 AM
Murray Foote Murray Foote is offline
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Red-crowned cranes
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  #7  
Old July 16th, 2014, 09:18 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is offline
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Waxwings in Jyväskylä, Finland


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  #8  
Old July 16th, 2014, 11:17 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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@ Murray,

Welcome back, traveler! What a home coming present! Beautiful to have one flying and one on the ground. what a range of form!

@ Jarmo, that's a spiffy red handkerchief! Is that the male?


Thanks guys!

Asher
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  #9  
Old July 20th, 2014, 01:23 PM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is offline
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Asher, thanks! I do believe they're males, although I wouldn't count too much on myself in this matter.
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  #10  
Old July 27th, 2014, 06:29 PM
Andy brown Andy brown is online now
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A couple of Australian Pelicans looking intelligent.
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  #11  
Old July 28th, 2014, 04:59 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy brown View Post


A couple of Australian Pelicans looking intelligent.

I like the Hollywood color scheme!

Asher
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  #12  
Old July 29th, 2014, 02:36 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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More than two birds visible here, but this was for the two swans and their look back to me.





Best regards,
Michael
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  #13  
Old July 29th, 2014, 04:05 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
More than two birds visible here, but this was for the two swans and their look back to me.



Michael.

I always wondered where the idea comes from about the role in 19th century art of the swan in seducing fair maidens, but for sure, this couple are so sensuous, their necks so close, curving around and caressing each other.

Would you ever even consider removing a leaf or extra bird to fit in with such a series, or that would be streng verboten?.................. and anyone who asked would get a whack on the knuckles, LOL!

Asher
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  #14  
Old July 29th, 2014, 10:08 PM
Winston Mitchell Winston Mitchell is offline
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Default Snow Geese

A pair of Snow Geese in a graceful departure from a near collision during a fly-off.




Snow Geese, Fort Boise WMA, Idaho


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  #15  
Old July 30th, 2014, 02:44 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Asher,

yes, Swans are a pleasure to watch and thanks to parks and people respecting them in most cases there are actually several Swan couples having their nests in Munich.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Would you ever even consider removing a leaf or extra bird to fit in with such a series, or that would be streng verboten?.................. and anyone who asked would get a whack on the knuckles, LOL!
Let me answer our question first with a question:
What is more rewarding for you - sitting at the pond or walking around the pond watching the swans and using your skill and patience and with some luck getting the shot you imagine or taking a picture which almost got there and spending time in front of a screen moving pixels around to finally get what you imagined?
Individual answers may differ, but I think that mine is clear.

Another aspect:
Editing photographs was pretty popular during the Staling era for official photographs. A photograph which was at some point a true representation of the seen became a lie.
The power to edit, which has been given to everybody in the era of digital photography with the different software packages that exist, makes that people make sometimes extensive use of it. The result is a creation that does often not show a truthful representation the seen.
When you see a picture, can you be sure that the photographer has seen it happen this way? You can of course try to analyze the picture for edits. There are ways to find out, but there are also ways to avoid detection.

The photograph of the pair of Snow Geese added by Winston is good to illustrate this, btw. a great capture, I like it.
One could take a Snow Goose picture and create a similar, but more 'perfect' shot by copying, mirroring and pasting in another sky. This may look more appealing for some because it seems perfect. I prefer the real thing.

Best regards,
Michael
__________________
I do not call myself an artist, I just try to capture what I see.
If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
my photos on flickr - here is the portion posted in OPF.

Last edited by Michael Nagel; July 30th, 2014 at 03:36 PM. Reason: typo
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  #16  
Old July 30th, 2014, 03:29 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Asher,

yes, Swans are a pleasure to watch and thanks to parks and people respecting them in most cases there are actually several Swan couples having their nests in Munich.
Michael,

I value very much your rich and detailed response.

Yes, you're so right, spending time enjoying the scene is far more useful than investing in hours of processing, wet darkroom or otherwise to create some lie about nature. I'd rather miss the perfect composition and have trust I'm see what actually happens in nature.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Asher,
Another aspect:
Editing photographs was pretty popular during the Staling era for official photographs. A photograph which was at some point a true representation of the seen became a lie.
Very important point. We have to be trusted. I like to announce what I've done or it's obvious when things are in the scene that are logically impossible, such as a person in there twice, (but not such that it would be by running across the area with a scanning back picture or else something obviously stitched). I almost always admit to stitching or a collage or some fantasy I'm expressing.

I don't think it's morally right to not add some admission of editing significant truth, such as shapes of features being altered or events being concocted and presented as a documentation of events. So I'm very much against sculpting faces, for example in Portrait Professional, although I do admit to using the software, but with all sculpting disabled), for someones portrait to get the lighting right and deal with rashes and the like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Asher,
The photograph of the pair of Snow Geese added by Winston is good to illustrate this, btw. a great capture, I like it.

One could take a Snow Goose picture and create a similar, but more 'perfect' shot by copying, mirroring and pasting in another sky. This may look more appealing for some because it seems perfect. I prefer the real thing.
Nicolas Claris has been a great influence on me as far as trying to report the truth. He shows boats that folk will spend large sums on and is scrupulously exact and honest down to the finest detail, texture and hue of materials and fabrics.

But you add another layer of discipline which I appreciate very much and serves to increase standards further, by asking what should be our priorities. You are asking us to consider, not what we can do, but what we should do to optimize our appreciation and expression of what we observe and experience.

Being able to watch what happens and sample it without interference, is perhaps the highest level and most satisfying application of photography. That applies to almost all kinds of photography. Even wedding photographers realize that approaching the couples' relationship, rather than a list of rote poses, leads to far better memories for the couple. Most of us take shortcuts and put folk and things where we can image them very well.

Holding a lantern up to ourselves and the world we have come to dominate, is a fine enough purpose. Discovering something worth saving for others is both a wonderful experience in itself and a great reward for the investment of understanding nature and patience. I appreciate you pointing the way to this wiser use of our efforts. For nature, it's especially important, as their are great benefits to understanding the interactions of all life forms. Removing species that are untidily "in the way", degrades our appreciation of biodiversity and interdependence. If we don't know the truth, how can we become good stewards? Habitats may appear idyllic at times, but they are almost never perfectly arranged for our preferences.


Thanks for adding this wisdom to out journeys looking at nature!

Asher
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  #17  
Old May 7th, 2017, 11:22 AM
Reginald Johnson Reginald Johnson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy brown View Post


A couple of Australian Pelicans looking intelligent.
The facial expressions seem to indicate that the couple is having a difference of opinion...


Reginald
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