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  #1  
Old December 17th, 2010, 05:24 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Default Hunt for the last people





Hunt for the last people - M Hampton


this is pushing a new direction for the work Hunt for the last people. A more intimate portrait space rather than the wider people images.

thanks for looking
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  #2  
Old December 17th, 2010, 05:29 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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Hi
This portrait is quite intriguing, nearly frightening, looks like a zombie or a witch...This look is freezing. The post prod on the picture is as usual exceptional and conveys the strangeness as well as the initial model and pose. The form and the content.

Well, how do you get on with the weather these days...
Heard one year ago "oh! you know, it never snow in Britain"
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  #3  
Old December 18th, 2010, 06:19 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandrine Bascouert View Post
Hi
This portrait is quite intriguing, nearly frightening, looks like a zombie or a witch...This look is freezing. The post prod on the picture is as usual exceptional and conveys the strangeness as well as the initial model and pose. The form and the content.

Well, how do you get on with the weather these days...
Heard one year ago "oh! you know, it never snow in Britain"
Sandrine,

thanks for the feedback, the production on it wasn't far from what I would normally do - although I did use high contrast blue filter to bring the skin tones out...

the weather is bloody cold at the moment !

cheers
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  #4  
Old December 18th, 2010, 06:29 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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Better stay inside with a warm blanket, lightroom or Photoshop or even a good old movie and a good old glass of uisge beatha, then! (I don't know if it's well spelled)
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  #5  
Old December 18th, 2010, 11:22 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandrine Bascouert View Post
Better stay inside with a warm blanket, lightroom or Photoshop or even a good old movie and a good old glass of uisge beatha, then! (I don't know if it's well spelled)
"Whiskey is a shortened form of usquebaugh, which English borrowed from Gaelic (Irish uisce beatha and Scottish uisge beatha). This compound descends from Old Irish uisce, "water", and bethad, "of life" and meaning literally "water of life". It meant the same thing as the Latin aqua vītae which had been applied to distilled drinks since early 14th century. Other early spellings include usquebea (1706) and iskie bae (1583). In the Irish Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1405, the first written record of whiskey appears describing the death of a chieftain at Christmas from "taking a surfeit of aqua vitae". In Scotland, the first evidence of whisky production comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent "To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae".[1]"WIKIPEDIA
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  #6  
Old December 18th, 2010, 11:25 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
This is pushing a new direction for the work Hunt for the last people. A more intimate portrait space rather than the wider people images.




Hunt for the last people - M Hampton



Mark,

This is narrow and somber indeed. Yes, there does seem to be a fleeting glimpse of a lost tribe at the edge of a dark place in the some unchartered forrest.

Asher
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  #7  
Old December 19th, 2010, 03:02 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
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Don't get the pic?
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  #8  
Old December 19th, 2010, 08:05 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Don't get the pic?
Ben,

Right click, save as.. or goto photobucket - look for hiedroom and its there!

easy.. Thanks for stopping by!
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  #9  
Old December 19th, 2010, 08:08 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
"Whiskey is a shortened form of usquebaugh, which English borrowed from Gaelic (Irish uisce beatha and Scottish uisge beatha). This compound descends from Old Irish uisce, "water", and bethad, "of life" and meaning literally "water of life". It meant the same thing as the Latin aqua vītae which had been applied to distilled drinks since early 14th century. Other early spellings include usquebea (1706) and iskie bae (1583). In the Irish Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1405, the first written record of whiskey appears describing the death of a chieftain at Christmas from "taking a surfeit of aqua vitae". In Scotland, the first evidence of whisky production comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent "To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae".[1]"WIKIPEDIA
uisge beatha - is also a pub in glasgow - which sells - whisky !!

thanks for the info and stopping by asher and sandrine ... slàinte mhath
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  #10  
Old December 19th, 2010, 09:49 AM
Mike Shimwell Mike Shimwell is offline
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And as you'll notice from Mark's spelling, Whisky is Scottish and Whiskey is Irish.

It's a pity we can't describe the soft sound of uisge beatha on a written forum

Mike
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  #11  
Old December 19th, 2010, 02:12 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
Ben,

Right click, save as.. or goto photobucket - look for hiedroom and its there!

easy.. Thanks for stopping by!
Mark,

So funny! I believe Ben is saying that He doesn't understand of "get" the meaning of your picture! Or were you being facetious. In any case, there's humor enough in the missing picture. Either the picture itself or my dear friend, Ben, is missing out!

Asher
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  #12  
Old December 19th, 2010, 04:21 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Shimwell View Post
And as you'll notice from Mark's spelling, Whisky is Scottish and Whiskey is Irish.

It's a pity we can't describe the soft sound of uisge beatha on a written forum

Mike
Mike,

we cant describe the taste or the feeling either !

I may post some Christmas suggestions for presents.

cheers
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  #13  
Old December 19th, 2010, 04:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
this is pushing a new direction for the work Hunt for the last people. A more intimate portrait space rather than the wider people images.






Hunt for the last people - M Hampton


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Don't get the pic?
Ben,

Am I correct in assuming that you do indeed receive and see the Mark's picture, "The hunt for the Last People", but it doesn't work for you as yet? For the sake of argument, and for others at least, (who may be flummoxed by such a work), allow me to discuss this apparently puzzled reception of such a strange and unrealistic picture. What's the intent of the photographer? How is it made to achieve these aims?

First, let's start where we are more sure of ourselves , your photography. Yemin Moshe, for example, is stellar and is about real things having exceptional presence, as if we're there. You take us to carefully chosen treasured places. You photograph treasured memories too.

In contrast to that, Mark's photograph, (and of of course you recognize that), is so very different! It's a dark fantasy, allegorical and not the usual portrait. For this, the old expectations are "out the window", so to speak! What we have now is the result of preparation, setting the mood and stark references, distancing us from reality. So gone here are the wide spectrum of pleasing harmonious tones. Detail is absent and there's no beauty of form we've come to expect of B&W photography. It's the physical and psychological gesture and motif that's now important!

This takes us not to places we'd like to go, but rather to states we might regret and dread.

Asher
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  #14  
Old December 19th, 2010, 04:34 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Mark,

So funny! I believe Ben is saying that He doesn't understand of "get" the meaning of your picture! Or were you being facetious. In any case, there's humor enough in the missing picture. Either the picture itself or my dear friend, Ben, is missing out!

Asher
Asher,

its was in fun,

I guess that people want to find things that confirm there view... Hunt comes from looking at August Sander "the last people" ... working through some ideas and moving into a space that I don't normally go.. the portrait..

I placed it in risk it - because it is a push on - and the very start... the skin when seen is marked/broken/used exposed as it is to light - i still have some issues with the light - but not with the concept...

the clssic portrait leaves me cold... or I dont get it!... as to why... i don't like the units of measure they dont move beyond the surface...

* whisky note - IONA 10 year old - clean spyside with a little wood and no medicine taste - although it comes from the islands - its made for export !
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  #15  
Old December 20th, 2010, 01:27 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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Mark, I'll break every little part of respect you may have for me. I can't stand Whisky. I am a real girly thing. I like cider, Bass ale, white wine, (Belgian hand made beers as well), a bit of polish vodka (no mix) that's it. I drink spirit about once every 2 years. My husband is a real fan of Whisky, it's a classic Christmas gift he is making to other people in order to make them discover something unusual. Don't even talk about something outside the Scottish borders . I just remember the ones he loves are Glenfarclas and Dalmore...I don't know what it says about him. All that I remember is when I was in Scotland, the pubs that sells whisky advertised for the pure spring water available beside the whisky more importantly than the whisky itself. When you say - in France - that you add water to whisky people look at you as if you were a barbarian. They add coke in their "black and white".
I wish I had taken some pictures of the atmosphere in these pubs, it was fantastic... Old men singing, shouting. And don't even tell that you are French, all the rounds are yours!
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  #16  
Old December 20th, 2010, 06:00 AM
charlotte thompson charlotte thompson is offline
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Mark

nice! it immediately has such a strength- also gives a look of an older time when photography was new
love the shadow and light work on this
can you tell me who this picture portrait is-a small background

Charlotte-
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  #17  
Old December 20th, 2010, 05:12 PM
Jim Galli Jim Galli is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Hampton View Post
Asher,


the clssic portrait leaves me cold... or I dont get it!... as to why... i don't like the units of measure they dont move beyond the surface...
I would certainly agree that there is much to be sought beyond the classic Hasselblad studio portrait.

You've captured the feeling of foreboding well enough in the brash transition from light to shadows. It looks like a frame capture from a 1930's piece of cine film.

I'll be interested to see more.
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  #18  
Old December 21st, 2010, 04:31 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandrine Bascouert View Post
Mark, I'll break every little part of respect you may have for me. I can't stand Whisky. I am a real girly thing. I like cider, Bass ale, white wine, (Belgian hand made beers as well), a bit of polish vodka (no mix) that's it. I drink spirit about once every 2 years. My husband is a real fan of Whisky, it's a classic Christmas gift he is making to other people in order to make them discover something unusual. Don't even talk about something outside the Scottish borders . I just remember the ones he loves are Glenfarclas and Dalmore...I don't know what it says about him. All that I remember is when I was in Scotland, the pubs that sells whisky advertised for the pure spring water available beside the whisky more importantly than the whisky itself. When you say - in France - that you add water to whisky people look at you as if you were a barbarian. They add coke in their "black and white".
I wish I had taken some pictures of the atmosphere in these pubs, it was fantastic... Old men singing, shouting. And don't even tell that you are French, all the rounds are yours!
Sandrine,

My wife did not like whisky until I converted her - she drank J D and coke. After a few bottles she started to like the taste.. a good place to start is Dalwhinnie 15 year old - there is a honey taste with some smoke ...

try it and report back - or get some for your husband !

cheers
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  #19  
Old December 21st, 2010, 04:42 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlotte thompson View Post
Mark

nice! it immediately has such a strength- also gives a look of an older time when photography was new
love the shadow and light work on this
can you tell me who this picture portrait is-a small background

Charlotte-
Charlotte,

its a picture of my wife - as for background to the work - I am using focus and shadow in conjunction - putting detail into the unseen metaphorically (the marginalised ) and through the process its self. I am glad you saw strength in this image.

thanks for looking
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  #20  
Old December 21st, 2010, 04:44 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Galli View Post
I would certainly agree that there is much to be sought beyond the classic Hasselblad studio portrait.

You've captured the feeling of foreboding well enough in the brash transition from light to shadows. It looks like a frame capture from a 1930's piece of cine film.

I'll be interested to see more.
Jim,

thanks for the feedback - I have some time to make some over the next few weeks...

thanks for looking..
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  #21  
Old December 23rd, 2010, 01:04 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
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Can I make a suggestion? The focus should be on the nearer eye. I realise this is far more impressionist than a photo however my eye is led into the picture from the right and I see first a blob then an eye. It just jangles for me.
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  #22  
Old December 23rd, 2010, 01:36 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
Can I make a suggestion? The focus should be on the nearer eye. I realise this is far more impressionist than a photo however my eye is led into the picture from the right and I see first a blob then an eye. It just jangles for me.
Ben,

I move from left to right, i enter on the focus, get pushed to the eyes and move back again to the focus...

this movement is a choice ... not a mistake or poor aiming... I may ask you why must I have the eyes or eye in focus?

an aside... I was raised as a catholic... denial and the holding back of what seems important fits me and my work like a glove...

so I would agree with you .. if the image was about the person then the eyes or eye becomes key.. this is not about who you think you see... this is not an image about creating the most beauty from light bouncing off some ones skull or manipulating-ting it to seem beautiful

this image is about the structure .. the bone and light ... the eyes are not key... but they are !

cheers
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  #23  
Old December 23rd, 2010, 11:38 PM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
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The point is that we as humans are trained to look to the eyes, from day one. It's the first part of a face we look to. As such in an image whether it be painting of photograph the same applies.
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  #24  
Old December 24th, 2010, 12:53 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
The point is that we as humans are trained to look to the eyes, from day one. It's the first part of a face we look to. As such in an image whether it be painting of photograph the same applies.
Ben,

This picture, then goes beyond that first line of training. This is the "gematria" of the face on bone.

Asher
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  #25  
Old December 28th, 2010, 09:34 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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- M Hampton
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  #26  
Old December 28th, 2010, 09:42 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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I think that the fact that focus stands on a very narrow stage, at a place that is not obvious, prevents us to look at the face, but rather to think shapes, and texture. It's funny how a simple shift in the regular way to focus on the eye for a portrait makes it different, barely not a portrait anymore.
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  #27  
Old December 29th, 2010, 02:19 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandrine Bascouert View Post
I think that the fact that focus stands on a very narrow stage, at a place that is not obvious, prevents us to look at the face, but rather to think shapes, and texture. It's funny how a simple shift in the regular way to focus on the eye for a portrait makes it different, barely not a portrait anymore.
Sandrine,

I agree that it makes a change in action of reading a portrait.. it becomes about the edges of the face / bones / and skin and the action of light/life over time on the skin.... the viewer is marginalized as the last people are (thats the hope)....







- M Hampton
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  #28  
Old December 29th, 2010, 02:49 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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For this one, we want to know what's outside the frame! the focus on the further eye, the fact that the man looks on the right (where the focus is) attracts us this way, where something potentially strange or frightening might stand.
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  #29  
Old December 31st, 2010, 03:57 AM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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- M Hampton





more hunting!
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